60 GHz Wi-Fi Products Now Possible; 7Gbps!

Monday the Wi-Fi Alliance and the Wireless Gigabit Alliance (WiGig) jointly announced a cooperation agreement that will allow Wi-Fi equipment to access the 60 GHz frequency band, and to provide better speeds in the current 2.4 and 5 GHz bands. Devices that will support all three bandwidths will be able to achieve up to 7 Gbps although the range will most likely be limited to in-room transfers. Still, this is good news for consumers who want to stream Blu-ray movies to a living room HDTV.

"60 GHz device connectivity will be an exciting enhancement to the capabilities of today's Wi-Fi technologies," said Wi-Fi Alliance chief executive officer Edgar Figueroa. "It will expand the utility of Wi-Fi, used by hundreds of millions of people every day. From its inception, the WiGig specification was designed to work on a wide variety of devices, making it a compelling input as we begin to define our certification program for 60 GHz wireless."

In a separate announcement, WiGig said that it published its unified wireless specification for the unlicensed 60 GHz spectrum. It also launched its royalty-free Adopter Program which allow members to develop products that use the spectrum "to deliver multi-gigabit-speed wireless communication." Cisco, Hitachi, Panasonic, and Toshiba have already jumped on board, and may have tri-band products ready by the end of the year.

"With this announcement today, and with our new partnership with the Wi-Fi Alliance, we are one step closer to fulfilling our vision of a unified 60 GHz ecosystem," said Dr. Ali Sadri, WiGig Alliance president and chairman. "We welcome all companies to join with us as we continue to drive the industry forward."

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    Top Comments
  • 60 Ghz is fast but rather useless. Very few applications for this make sense (like the example of streaming to a TV in the same room). At 60 Ghz the wavelength is much shorter, hell people moving around the room could block the signal.
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  • Other Comments
  • Can a stronger signalled version of this be sent down some form of fibre-optic cables?
    -14
  • This is pretty interesting though it does sound like it could have some bad problems as well. This is a semi-high frequency microwave and in the same range that is used for military electric countermeasures. It will also be very prone to interference and will perform very poorly in humid areas and at low altitudes. It would work great in a desert or on a mountain though.
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  • 60 Ghz is fast but rather useless. Very few applications for this make sense (like the example of streaming to a TV in the same room). At 60 Ghz the wavelength is much shorter, hell people moving around the room could block the signal.
    17