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Google Prepping NFC Checkout Trials for NYC, SF

Near Field Communication, a technology that allows for the wireless transfer of data over short distances, is fast gaining traction in the smartphone world as a way to process mobile payments and it looks like Google is eager to jump on board. The search giant and maker of the Android OS is said to be gearing up to launch NFC trials in New York City and San Francisco.

According to Bloomberg sources, Google will be ponying up for the installation of thousands of special cash-register systems for merchants in the two cities. Designed to accept payments from phones with NFC support, the trial is said to be kicking off in the next four months time.

With Android 2.3 supporting NFC, more Android phones with integrated-NFC are expected as the year wears on. Samsung’s Nexus S already supports NFC, while the company’s upcoming Galaxy S II will also have integrated-NFC. The Nokia C7 already supports NFC and a firmware update expected later in the year will switch on the functionality.

Read more about Google's supposed plans on Bloomberg.

  • mosu
    Can't wait to see my credit card cleaned in the crowded place with a NFC card reader.Hope they know what they're doing!
    Reply
  • tomaz99
    mosuCan't wait to see my credit card cleaned in the crowded place with a NFC card reader.Hope they know what they're doing!
    Luckily you pointed that out for them...seems like something easy to miss...
    Reply
  • martel80
    I guess any incoming payment request opens up a confirmation dialog on the phone?
    Reply
  • eddieroolz
    About time. Japan's been doing this for a decade with transit passes and cellphones.
    Reply
  • RFID under a new name.I urge people to stay away from this technology.
    Reply
  • mkrijt
    bseven54RFID under a new name.I urge people to stay away from this technology.I completely agree with you.
    Reply
  • house70
    eddieroolzAbout time. Japan's been doing this for a decade with transit passes and cellphones.One thing to use for transit passes... another to put your credit card/banking on the line like that. I won't use this technology, unless there is absolutely no other choice (like, everybody uses it and there are no more credit cards in the world).
    Reply
  • custodian-1
    I wonder how log it will last before someone breaks the code.
    Reply
  • fancarolina
    I'm scared Google will make this technology work. At least on the iPhone you can just hold it wrong and block the signal.
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    About time. Japan's been doing this for a decade with transit passes and cellphones.

    and look what happened to them
    Reply