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Protect Bush From Shoes in Flash Game

Yesterday President George Bush played dodge ball with a pair of shoes. Now gamers can watch him do it again while dodging bullets.



Yesterday the world watched in "shock and awe" as President George W. Bush dodged two shoes thrown at his head, apparently quick at the draw with a melon, obviously a hard-core Wii Fit player (soccer head butt). The beloved President, visiting the Iraqi prime minister's office to mark the signing of a new security agreement, showed the world on live TV that he could still dodge whatever the press could throw at him during the now-historical press conference.

Of course, the assailant, an Iraqi television journalist who wanted to send his final goodbye kiss to the American president, could have just had bad aim. Still, the President shrugged off the attack like a watered-down version of Walker: Texas Ranger." I'm OK," he said after the incident. "All I can report is [that] it is a size 10."

Although the President's humor can be cheesy at best, T-Enterprise decided to take that cheese one step further by developing a parodying Flash game based on the televised incident. Entitled Bush's Boot Camp, gamers assume the role of a Secret Service agent dual-wielding two loaded pistols. The object of the game is to shoot the projectile shoes before they reach the President, mimicking a FPS in appearance only. The President loses health points if player's shoot directly at him ("It'll take that to restore chaos," he'll say when shot), or if a shoe comes in contact. It's not difficult to shoot the President, and it's speculated that the aiming difficulty was implemented on purpose. The game ends when Bush's health bar reaches zero.

T-Enterprise seemed to find the whole thing amusing, point out one obvious flaw in security. "If you watch the video clip, the Secret Service don't move to protect the President until the second shoe has been thrown," Sadi Chishti, managing director of T-Enterprise, told Telegraph.co.uk. "We're hoping the agents will use this game as a training aid for future footwear attacks on world leaders."

Besides the current interactive parody, T-Enterprise also has a large portfolio of viral flash games available online, taking comical jabs at American political figures, British Airway's Willie Walsh, Heather Mills, Reality TV and other topics. While Bush's Boot Camp remains simple and somewhat tasteless, it certainly gives a comical overview of the President's current social stance. It's unfortunate that the televised press conference will likely become a visual staple in American history, depicting the entire two terms of President Bush tenure in one brief moment. The game should be equally as memorable even if it only lets off a bit of steam for frustrated voters.