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1.76 Billion iOS, Android Apps Downloaded Last Week of 2012

By - Source: Flurry | B 3 comments

Represents 65 percent increase when compared to weekly average during December.

The last week of 2012 experienced a considerable increase in the number of apps downloaded by iOS and Android users.

Data research firm Flurry Analytics revealed that from December 25 through December 31, 1.76 billion applications were downloaded by iOS and Android users, representing an increase of 65 percent when compared to the weekly average of 1.07 billion between December 4 and December 17.

604 million of the apps were downloaded in the U.S. last week, followed by China with 183 million downloads. The U.K. came in at third with 132 million downloads.

On Christmas day, meanwhile, a total of 328 million applications were downloaded across both Apple and Google's mobile operating systems. December 25 saw users downloading 20 million apps per hour, which is an increase of more than double their daily December average.

As for hardware, Flurry found that on Christmas day, 17.4 million iOS and Android devices were activated. More than 50 million iOS and Android devices were activated during the last week of 2012.

Flurry expects that more than 1 billion apps will be downloaded on a weekly basis until some point during the fourth quarter, which is when it believes iOS and Android app downloads will cumulatively reach the 2 billion mark each week.

Flurry's data derives from analysis it conducted on more than 260,000 applications available on iOS and Android. It claims that it detects 90 percent of all new devices activated each day, with its analytics service for developers running on more than one-quarter of the apps downloaded on a daily basis on Apple's App Store and the Google Play marketplace. To maximize reliability, all of that data is subsequently compared to publicly available figures released by Apple and Google.

 

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    beardguy , January 3, 2013 5:33 PM
    Mobile apps are cheap and easily accessible since the majority of people now own smart phones. It's not really a surprise at all to see these numbers. Still I would say the majority of apps out there are nothing more than amusing time wasters.

    As a user of the iPhone and now Android for some time, I still only use a core set of apps that I find useful. You could probably lump every single app in both markets (Android and Apple) into like 5 or 6 main categories. There isn't really anything new or innovative being done.

    Not to hate or anything, I just think mobile apps and their importance is WAY overrated.
  • 0 Hide
    mydrrin , January 3, 2013 5:56 PM
    It's not that it's importance can be overrated. Games have always been time wasters and people are spending their money on mobile games and not on DS's and Vita software. There is a dramatic shift in where money is being spent. Sure you can say that they aren't worth whatever you paid, but you can say that far more than the DS title you paid $30-$40 for, than for a $1-2 that gave you the same amount of time of entertainment.
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    everygamer , January 4, 2013 12:32 AM
    mydrrinIt's not that it's importance can be overrated. Games have always been time wasters and people are spending their money on mobile games and not on DS's and Vita software. There is a dramatic shift in where money is being spent. Sure you can say that they aren't worth whatever you paid, but you can say that far more than the DS title you paid $30-$40 for, than for a $1-2 that gave you the same amount of time of entertainment.


    I have played very few $2-$4 games on iOS or Android that have the same level of content/complexity as full games developed for gaming platforms. Most $1 games I download might get a few hours before I move on, most platform games are designed for 20+ hours of gameplay.
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