Skip to main content

Sony Bravia TVs to Stream From Netflix

Sony Bravia HDTV's set up with the Internet Link feature will be able to stream movies and TV shows from Netflix starting this fall.

The Bravia Internet Link is available as a break-out box that connects to compatible Sony televisions, and now some of the newer models have the functionality built in.

"Sony was first to bring Internet video to TV and we continue to deliver the one of the largest and most diverse catalogs of content to customers through BRAVIA Internet Video," said Jeff Goldstein, vice president of Sony Electronics' television business. "Adding Netflix gives many of our customers access to a vast library of streaming content through their existing Netflix accounts."

Netflix subscribers can access their account to build their instant queues for viewing over the net on their Bravia set. Netflix joins other providers including Amazon Video On Demand, YouTube, Sports Illustrated, Sony Pictures, Crackle, Slacker, Epicurious.com, Concierge.com, Style.com, Golflink.com, Livestrong.com, and eHow.com and Dailymotion.

While this is excellent news for Sony Bravia owners, this does beg the question on why such a deal isn't carrying over to the PlayStation 3. Granted, Sony Electronics and Sony Computer Entertainment may have separate deals in the works, but there does seem to be a little disconnect when a Bravia box has access to Netflix and the premier Sony entertainment and media device doesn't.

  • IronRyan21
    This would be nice if netflix would have more content available for instant play....
    Reply
  • sailfish
    A more exciting event is if Netflix and Hulu would enter into an agreement to allow wireless streaming of Hulu content.
    Reply
  • teamhead
    Even more exciting new feature is Netflix Streaming from Sony Bravia TVs. =O
    Reply
  • pender21
    This is stupid. It is not built into the TV, it is an external module.
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-10282740-1.html
    Reply
  • hikayu
    pender21This is stupid. It is not built into the TV, it is an external module.http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-10282740-1.html
    that only apply to tv that are from 2008 or before . most , if not all ,m tv sony released 2009 now have internet link built in . i dont think you need to buy that crappy box that nobody even pay attention to .
    sony has their own video service on ps3 . if they even consider an alternative , it would be live streaming and i guess they'll have to put netflix or something else on because we all know that even though sony's sever has imrpoved greatly over the year , it isnt that powerful .i agree hulu should be on every single piece of technology that can connect to the internet .
    Reply
  • apmyhr
    Perhaps there is no deal between PS3 and Netflix, but my friend says he views Netflix instant streaming on his PS3 all the time through the built in browser. Might not be as convenient as the XBOX 360 setup, but it still gets the job done.
    Reply
  • ram1009
    What isn't mentioned is that for $100 you can buy a small set top module that allows streaming of Netflix to ANY tv, even analog. I've been using it for over a year now.
    Reply
  • dark_lord69
    That's neet..
    You know what is not neet?
    The price of a Sony Bravia VS almost any other TV.
    Reply
  • joebob2000
    Is the streaming the new flavor of "total complete crap" that Microsoft has Netflix force feeding their customers? If you don't know what I am talking about, google 'netflix silverlight'. The short version is that somewhere between Netflix, Microsoft, and the film studios, pressure arose to switch from the brilliantly high quality flash/windowsMedia based streams over to a silverlight powered, machine bogging, blocky stream of complete crap that is all but unwatchable.
    Reply
  • joebob2000
    P.S. in case I wasn't clear, Netflix streaming service completely sucks, I wouldn't even think about getting a set top box much less a TV that had a premium price thanks to this 'feature'. They screwed their customers directly by caving to pressure from Microsoft and the film studios to force Silverlight and low quality video onto their customers when they had a high quality, very efficient player all along.
    Reply