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Rumor: iPhone 5 to Feature Quad-core CPU from Samsung

With summer well underway, the Apple rumor-mill is chugging along in preparation for the launch of the next iPhone. Expected to be announced in September, just like the iPhone 4S last year, we don't know a whole lot about the iPhone 5. As usual, Apple is keeping pretty quiet, so we're left to scour the web for talk of the device.

The latest comes via Digitimes and relates to the CPU we can expect to find powering the newest iPhone. The site quotes industry sources in reporting that competition in the quad-core smartphone arena is going to heat up considerably in Q4 thanks to the launch of a quad-core iPhone 5. Not only that, but this new iteration of the iPhone will be running on none other than Samsung's quad-core Exynos CPU.

If this rumor is true, it represents a significant performance increase over the iPhone 4S, which used a dual-core A5. However, we also need to consider the possibilty of an LTE iPhone 5. Right now, quad-core phones generally don't mix with America's LTE networks. For this reason, many manufacturers of quad-core devices have swapped in a dual-core CPU for the American market. This includes Samsung's Galaxy SIII, which uses a quad-core Exynos in international markets but a dual-core Snapdragon from Qualcomm in the U.S. With the launch of the 4G iPad six months ago, we're not sure Apple would choose quad-core over LTE. Still, we could be wrong. Guess we'll have to wait and see.

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  • How could Apple and Samsung possibly work together on this after the legal battle over tablets? Makes no sense as each company wants the other gone.
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  • chromonoid
    KapperHow could Apple and Samsung possibly work together on this after the legal battle over tablets? Makes no sense as each company wants the other gone.of course not dummy, samsung has manufactured iPhones CPUs since ever.
    Reply
  • amuffin
    Kind of ironic how Samsung manufactures the chips for the IOS devices.
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  • englandr753
    Unless the network is making changes to support quads, I'm certain, as usual, that the US market will get a downgraded product compared to the rest of the world thanks to the market being comfortable charging what they do with lagging services compared to the rest of the world.

    Reply
  • belardo
    So why does LTE eats 2 cores?
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  • The cell phone network could care less what processor you have in the phone...this is a compatibility issue between the CPU and RF chipset.
    Reply
  • gfair
    belardoSo why does LTE eats 2 cores?
    My guess is the leading edge is being pursued so aggressively that quad cores suck too much battery for LTE, so to save useable life, 2 cores are dropped.

    KapperHow could Apple and Samsung possibly work together on this after the legal battle over tablets? Makes no sense as each company wants the other gone.
    Kapper - Samsung isn't just competing for smartphone sales, it's a vertically integrated corporation that makes CPUs and screens as well, both of which are also in an arms race. And the iPhone is the #1 selling smartphone overall (if not recently due to the SGS3), so Samsung's competition is also one of its largest customers and gives it a healthy amount of revenue and profit to drive the CPU arms race.
    Reply
  • SlitelyOff
    Why don't quad cores work with LTE? What does a signal/communication protocol have to do with the number of CPU's?
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  • Kami3k
    KapperHow could Apple and Samsung possibly work together on this after the legal battle over tablets? Makes no sense as each company wants the other gone.
    FRAND.
    Reply
  • blazorthon
    gfairMy guess is the leading edge is being pursued so aggressively that quad cores suck too much battery for LTE, so to save useable life, 2 cores are dropped.Kapper - Samsung isn't just competing for smartphone sales, it's a vertically integrated corporation that makes CPUs and screens as well, both of which are also in an arms race. And the iPhone is the #1 selling smartphone overall (if not recently due to the SGS3), so Samsung's competition is also one of its largest customers and gives it a healthy amount of revenue and profit to drive the CPU arms race.
    Samsung also produces RAM chips and I think that they make NAND flash chips too. Heck, they might make even more.
    Reply