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Ultraviolet Format Close to Commercial Release

A report from Pocket-lint suggests that the Ultraviolet movie format is close to officially going commercial. For consumers, this means that for every Blu-ray and DVD they've purchased over the years, they'll also unlock a cloud-stored digital version that can be streamed on up to 12 registered Ultraviolet devices. All they need is the UPC symbol in order to register their movie.

But for those who don't want to purchase discs, there are plans to introduce a pay model that simply offers the rights to the digital Ultraviolet version. However both models are reportedly backed by all but one of the studios, almost every major consumer electronics manufacturer, several major retailers, and over 70 other technology companies.

Disney and Apple have yet to sign on.

"All but one [of the major studios] have signed on... And that doesn't mean that they won't," said Danny Kaye, executive vice president of Global Research & Technology Strategy at Fox. He was referring to Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment who he believes will ultimately offer UV versions of its catalog.

And what of Apple? Surely the company has nothing to lose given that it doesn't directly sell movie and TV episodes on physical discs. If anything, Apple would simply offer permanent cloud storage for its digital video so that users can stream anytime the want. Of course, we're talking about Apple who seemingly loves control over all aspects of its devices, software and the accompanying multimedia.

Unsurprisingly, Apple has resisted in shifting over to the UV side... possibly in favor of its own video cloud offering. "That also doesn't mean they won't," said Kaye. "From my perspective, when you're well established you sometimes take a 'wait and see.'"

He added that Apple may not wait for too long once its rivals start getting way ahead in the game. "If you just take smartphones as an example, Android now enjoys quite a market advantage," Kaye said. "And the same thing's going to happen in tablets. We also have all the other hardware that's a part of this ecosystem - the majority of hardware and software companies will create very strong competition, just like it has with Blu-ray. And we'll see what happens as we go forward."

"[Ultraviolet is] one of the largest consortia ever, especially across industries," he added. "And when that happens, you succeed."

  • alxianthelast
    Apple and Microsoft both need to stick picking their butts with regard to content that CAN'T be served online due to their massive size and bitrate.
    Reply
  • Soma42
    "For consumers, this means that for every Blu-ray and DVD they've purchased over the years, they'll also unlock a cloud-stored digital version that can be streamed on up to 12 registered Ultraviolet devices."

    Good, it's about time people don't have to re-purchase their entire movie collection just because a new format comes out.

    Does any current Blu-ray player support this? Or do you have to buy a new box?
    Reply
  • alxianthelast
    Soma42Does any current Blu-ray player support this? Or do you have to buy a new box?
    New format, new hardware; diodes, likely a new compression format as well and security since AACS isn't perfect.
    Reply
  • afrobacon
    Great, a new format. I haven't even bought a Blu-ray player yet.
    Reply
  • dioxholster
    someone explain what this new format does?
    Reply
  • Khimera2000
    Thats cool :) Im hoping theres a way to switch out those 12 devices. Heres hoping the digital only deal goes smooth.

    to Dioxholster it helps standerdise digital movies, at least from a distrebution standpoint, it also helps push cloud services to :)
    Reply
  • nekoangel
    dioxholstersomeone explain what this new format does?digital distribution. its not a physical media to replace blue ray.
    Reply
  • Cloud all over the place.... Stream to 12 devices..... It is all meaningless when CAPS are raping you....
    Reply
  • td854
    shawn808stingrayCloud all over the place.... Stream to 12 devices..... It is all meaningless when CAPS are raping you....
    So sad, but so true...
    That said, I don't have caps on either of my ISPs :x
    Reply
  • alidan
    i have about a 200gb soft cap, god knows i have gone well over that some months.

    assuming this is compressed data, and its compressed well, 1 blu ray quality movie, at 1080p could be as small as 4gb, and up to about 8gb for a standard length movie. for damn near indistinguishable form dvd quality, 1gb about, and this is from a novice encoder, you could probably get that down to 700mb

    all that said, how many people are watching 200 dvd quality movies a month, 50 720p or 25 1080p?

    now, as to bluray players... it is possible for ones that can update firmware to support this, i believe, i wont go into how, because it may be incredibly stupid on my part, but it may be possible.
    Reply