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U.S. Copyright Office Opposes Google Book Deal

As the latest entity to offer a negative opinion on the proposed settlement between the Authors Guild and search giant Google, the U.S. Copyright Office has said the agreement would alter the landscape of copyright law.

Reuters cites Register of Copyrights Marybeth Peters as saying the Office originally viewed the agreement as positive but soon shifted its view because the class action settlement covered future behavior instead of just redressing past actions.

"The settlement would bind authors, publishers, their heirs and successors to these rules, even though Google has not yet scanned and may never scan their works," Peters said in her written testimony.

With more countries and organizations opposing the deal every day (and the Department of Justice's antitrust division investigating), do you think it's likely that this deal will be abandoned? Google and Yahoo! last year had a highly controversial ad deal in the works that both companies said was penned to meet DOJ standards. However, that deal was abandoned just hours before the DOJ made a decision as to whether or not the deal could go ahead. Do you think history could repeat itself? Let us know in the comments below.

More on the U.S. Copyright Office's objection here.

  • tenor77
    Well if you're not a patent troll then you're gonna get shot down.
    Reply
  • balister
    tenor77Well if you're not a patent troll then you're gonna get shot down.
    The Copyright Office does not deal with patents.
    Reply
  • Shadow703793
    LOL! Why are so many against this?!?!? I guess they just don't want people to get educated.
    Reply
  • Hanin33
    i don't really understand why Google is getting the focus here... if the Authors Guild has the right to get into this deal with Google... how can Google be accused of trying to corner the book market? wouldn't the Authors Guild also be colluding to achieve that? if what the Authors Guild has to offer does not equate to what the opposition says it has the ability to do, why not go after them for going beyond the scope of their privileges with the rights given to them by the various authors and the such?
    Reply
  • The books are out of copyright, this is not their concern. Corruption is rampant in America, where there's a politician opposing something, there's a lobbyist giving them money and sexual favors.
    Reply
  • Hanin33
    ok... so why did i get marked down with no response? the question remains... if the Authors Guild has the right to sell Google what they want, then why isn't the Authors Guild being questioned?
    Reply
  • Major7up
    I think Google needs a more open and less restrictive deal in order to appeal to the public and other parties. I suggested before that they might be allowed to offer content free to users by supporting it with ads while others could sell it outright. But Google along with everyone else needs to pay royalties and they should be equal royalty amounts for everyone so that no one has an advantage.
    Reply
  • 1234321
    You know what go to a library, way to kill shit google.
    Reply
  • tester24
    It's all about the money people that's all it's ever been about. Copywrite doesn't know how to approach this so they naturally they don't like it. These are uncharted waters that Google is venturing in. Personally I like the fact that we are able to get books that have been out of print for a while. Instead of having to pay outrageous Amazons pricing. Amazon is naturally pissed because so far they have a strangle hold on the online book selling market.

    But like always people are afraid of the changes this deal will have.
    Reply
  • croc
    Major7UpI think Google needs a more open and less restrictive deal in order to appeal to the public and other parties. I suggested before that they might be allowed to offer content free to users by supporting it with ads while others could sell it outright. But Google along with everyone else needs to pay royalties and they should be equal royalty amounts for everyone so that no one has an advantage.
    Why, as an Australian, should I have to deal with an American guild?

    The problem, as I see it, is that google is assuming that if something is 'out of print' in the US, then it is fair game for their 'library'. Well, pardon me, but the US is NOT the center of all things legal... But if google succeeds in this endeavor, as it currently stands, then it will be violating many foreign copyrights. Not to mention depriving me, an Australian author, of my means of livlihood. I would have far less issue with this scheme if it were an 'opt in' policy. It is all about google's definition of 'orphan' works, see. What may be considered an 'orphan' work in the US may very well NOT be an 'orphan' work in some parts of the rest of the world. Take Darwin's works for instance. Not 'orphan' works in the eyes of much of the rest of the world, but could very well be considered so under google's definition.

    I'm just pleased that the US copyright registry has stepped up to the crease and taken a front-foot stand. I just hope that google's lawyers don't get an early wicket from this.
    Reply