New Zealand ISP Offers Way Around Geo-specific Sites

Region-specific content is one of our pet-peeves when it comes to digital media, and we're certain we're not alone in our distaste for those pesky 'not available in your region' notices that crop up from time to time. However, one ISP in New Zealand is hoping to offer its customers a chance to surf the web free from the restrictions imposed by geographically-specific sites and services.

Newly launched ISP FXY ('fix') is looking to remedy the fact that poor New Zealand is "passed over when toys are being handed out by the international gods-of-cool-and-fun."

"FYX is an ISP that is all about open access and freedom. We have enabled a technology we like to call 'Global Mode' which creates freedom for New Zealand internet users that doesn't exist elsewhere," the company's website reads, later highlighting Global Mode as an alternative to piracy.

"There is a bunch of stuff on the internet that a few of us didn't have the freedom to access (without stealing it, and we aren't into that). So we decided to FYX the internet by removing some of the barriers that were getting in the way of great choice."

Launched on Friday, May 4, FYX is a sub-brand of Maxnet, which already offers high-speed internet and data center services in New Zealand. Speaking in a press statement. Maxnet CEO John Hanna said FYX will focus on consumers while Maxnet will continue to cater to businesses and their needs.

It'll be interesting to see how much, if any, trouble FYX gets into for advertising a service like this. Though the company maintains that it is not a content provider and just wants increased access and openness for web users, we imagine not all companies will see the noble side of its cause. FYX also notes on its FAQ that customers should still abide by the terms and conditions set out by the company running the service they want access to.

"Many websites, whether available because of Global Mode or not require you to agree to terms and conditions before you start using its service. Global Mode does not negate you from these responsibilities or act on your behalf," the FAQ reads.

(via NBR)

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  • antilycus
    MLB.TV, SKY.TV, and SUNDAY TICKET, look out. Thank god something finally comes along to take the big networks off their sports monopoly throwns. OTA and DIGITAL TV are a dying medium, this will help open up other forms of revenue for the giants. With Fox sports owning all the rights to our MLB team and me not willing to pay for cable or satellite (since i still have to suffer through their ads, if I pay I shouldn't have to watch ads) there is now a different option.
    12
  • Other Comments
  • antilycus
    MLB.TV, SKY.TV, and SUNDAY TICKET, look out. Thank god something finally comes along to take the big networks off their sports monopoly throwns. OTA and DIGITAL TV are a dying medium, this will help open up other forms of revenue for the giants. With Fox sports owning all the rights to our MLB team and me not willing to pay for cable or satellite (since i still have to suffer through their ads, if I pay I shouldn't have to watch ads) there is now a different option.
    12
  • RipperjackAU
    I wonder if I can take advantage of this service from the USA. As an Aussie Ex-pat, I would love to watch Good News Week, over the web, as it isn't shown on US cable, but Noooooo!

    Channel 10 are being anal about viewers outside of Australia, so no webcast viewing for me.

    DAMN YOU CHANNEL 10!!!!
    6
  • mesab66
    A simple VPN is another way round this.
    -2