Japanese Scientists Create Elastic Water

Bernama, a part of the Malaysian National News Agency, reports that Japanese scientists have created “elastic water." Developed at the Tokyo University, the new material consists mostly of water--95-percent--with an added two grams of clay and organic material. The resulting substance resembles jelly, but is extremely elastic and transparent.

The invention was originally revealed last week in the latest issue of the Nature scientific magazine. According to the article, the new material is quite safe for the environment and humans, and may be a “long-term” tool in medical technology, possibly to help wounded or surgically cut tissue to remain closed.

Bernama also reports that--by increasing its density--the new material could be used to produce "ecologically plastic materials," or could replace plastic altogether. This aspect is still under investigation until September 2010. However, if successful, the scientists may have found a way to make the world a little greener.

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    Top Comments
  • omnimodis78
    Absolutely any research done to replace plastic with something more organic is a step in the right direction!
    27
  • sicpric
    Does it come in strawberry flavor?
    15
  • Khimera2000
    El_CapitanSix months later in related news: Elastic water causes cancer...


    in the state of California :D

    any way this is an interesting development maybe they can use it to compliment other traditional materials for say... vibration dampening??? if you can make it about as strong as plastic... well don't get your cellphone wet :D
    12
  • Other Comments
  • gwolfman
    lol
    -13
  • omnimodis78
    Absolutely any research done to replace plastic with something more organic is a step in the right direction!
    27
  • Khimera2000
    El_CapitanSix months later in related news: Elastic water causes cancer...


    in the state of California :D

    any way this is an interesting development maybe they can use it to compliment other traditional materials for say... vibration dampening??? if you can make it about as strong as plastic... well don't get your cellphone wet :D
    12