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Fox Now Blocking Google TV Too

Wednesday Google TV Product Manager Rishi Chandra went on stage at the NewTeeVee 2010 conference and said that the company isn't out to replace cable. The announcement seemingly occurred while Fox.com began blocking its content from Google TV, joining other networks that include NBC, CBS and ABC.

According to reports, Google TV users are getting a "not compatible with your device" error when loading up Fox.com in Google TV's Chrome browser. At the time of this writing, Fox did not offer an explanation, however ABC and NBC have previously argued that Google wasn't doing enough to filter out pirate video from Google TV search results.

Additionally, Hulu has also blocked Google TV from its free streaming service, however its speculated that Hulu merely plans to offer the paid version at a later date. Ted Turner's TBS, TNT and CNN have actually embraced Google TV along with HBO, CNBC, Netflix and others.

During the interview, Chandra put a positive spin on the network blocks, referring back to the debut of VHS, DVD and DVR as content owners try to understand what the "new technology" means to them. The same situation now applies to the likes of Fox and NBC as they embrace the new technology we call the World Wide Web. Essentially, how will the streaming technology pay the bills while keeping cable providers happy.

But as previously mentioned, Google doesn't want to replace cable--cord-cutting is not happening any time soon. In fact, the company wants to combine cable programming and Internet TV into one device. "It's not TV or Web," he said in the interview. "It's TV and Web."

The problem with the TV/Web combo concept is that it turns the typical 300-channel selection into millions of channels, thus demanding a search engine so that viewers can find what they want. Herein is where the dispute between networks and Google resides, as the search engine not only pulls in legitimate content, but links to pirated content as well.

But according to Chandra, the search feature isn't necessarily a "search engine," but rather the evolution of the current linear list used in the TV guide (scrolling or digital).

"One of the new capabilities this platform allows is a way to rethink content discovery," he explained. [The guide] doesn't work when you go from 300 channels to millions of channels. You need a new paradigm for how you actually search and discover and find new content to watch."

He used Google TV's YouTube LeanBack as an example, allowing users to essentially create their own channels by typing in search entries like "Elmo" and "LeBron James."

Ultimately Chandra seemed confident that Google will eventually reach some kind agreement with the big networks. "This is very early days, in terms of where Google TV is and where the platform is at," he said.

  • gorillateets
    I don't see what all the networks wouldn't embrace google TV. Bunch of greedy turds.
    Reply
  • Grims
    Interesting. They claim it is because Google isn't filtering pirated content...so they pull out leaving the users with nothing but the pirated content to pick from.
    Reply
  • hellwig
    Hmm.. so if Google is going to show you the listing for this weeks new episode of Fringe on your local Fox affiliate, last weeks episode on Hulu.com, and a torrent of last weeks episode some guy posted to the web, Fox and Hulu would prefer you download that guys torrent? Why else would they block access to their websites?

    Besides, GoogleTV is basically a computer with TV-input/output, for dummies. I have my own computer with 2 TV tuners connected to my HDTV with an HDMI cable. I can a lot more than I could with Google TV. Using the webbrowser, I can search the internet for streams of other programs I want to watch, I can visit Hulu.com, Youtube.com, Netflix.com, etc... Using BeyondTV, I can watch my cable TV (and record it to the harddrive in DivX format). I even have a wireless keyboard and mouse so I don't have to get up from my recliner to do all this.

    These companies are responding like so many other companies, with their head so far up their hind ends they can't see what they're doing. Blocking GoogleTV stops nothing. Just like DRM. DRM is a headache to legitimate purchasers, while those who truly want to pirate the content break the DRM (I give it a couple weeks before hacked BluRay players start streaming out of China).

    The networks and websites should be working with Google to help promote the service. They probably just want a bigger cut of Google's ad money, neglecting the fact that they could make their own ad money if they weren't blocking their product from the service.
    Reply
  • jomofro39
    Another sad situation of the misinformed making decisions based on poor information. Like Blockbuster NOT embracing instant streaming....or dvd-mailing....and where are they now?
    Reply
  • bildo123
    Good...no..no...this is GREAT! Think about it for second...all those TV networks play nothing but trash and useless drivel anyways...basically an entertainment level a hair above the alternative of staring at the wall until it's time for bed.
    Reply
  • awood28211
    So how is this device really different from your pc. should fox block my pc because i can find alternate (re: pirate) content using google on it?
    Reply
  • tu_illegalamigo
    Hellwig has been making plenty of good points lately! If Faux and hulu won`t give me what I want, then the pirate bay will, that`s how consumer economics work Rupert!
    Reply
  • bustapr
    Fox, cnn, abc, nbc... all non-cable channels. Why are they biching? Im up for cutting the cord...
    Reply
  • Onus
    They probably don't want Google's advertising (which WILL be present) from diluting their own advertising.
    What a waste...all this focus on advertising masticates a massive moist movement...
    Reply
  • kinggraves
    hellwigHmm.. so if Google is going to show you the listing for this weeks new episode of Fringe on your local Fox affiliate, last weeks episode on Hulu.com, and a torrent of last weeks episode some guy posted to the web, Fox and Hulu would prefer you download that guys torrent? Why else would they block access to their websites?Besides, GoogleTV is basically a computer with TV-input/output, for dummies. I have my own computer with 2 TV tuners connected to my HDTV with an HDMI cable. I can a lot more than I could with Google TV. Using the webbrowser, I can search the internet for streams of other programs I want to watch, I can visit Hulu.com, Youtube.com, Netflix.com, etc... Using BeyondTV, I can watch my cable TV (and record it to the harddrive in DivX format). I even have a wireless keyboard and mouse so I don't have to get up from my recliner to do all this.These companies are responding like so many other companies, with their head so far up their hind ends they can't see what they're doing. Blocking GoogleTV stops nothing. Just like DRM. DRM is a headache to legitimate purchasers, while those who truly want to pirate the content break the DRM (I give it a couple weeks before hacked BluRay players start streaming out of China).The networks and websites should be working with Google to help promote the service. They probably just want a bigger cut of Google's ad money, neglecting the fact that they could make their own ad money if they weren't blocking their product from the service.
    Just to throw this out (again), the Logitech Revue doesn't even HAVE a screw-in cable input like a PC TV tuner would. You must have a cable box with HDMI output to get your cable lineup, so they get their money from that.
    I still don't believe this is really about pirated content itself, but the fact GoogleTV gives you alternatives to a pricey cable service. Many consumers are still ignorant to all the options that are available on the internet, legal or not. Once you've been told every show you usually watch on cable is on Hulu, Netflix, or Youtube, why would you want to pay for cable? It's not because they allow pirated content, it's because of how EASY GoogleTV makes alternatives. GoogleTV is going to be the nerdy friend on the sofa of computer illiterates, going "hey, you know that's on Hulu for free right? Just click here!"

    As stated though, it's going to happen whether they like it or not. Block the legal content and people will still search and get the illegal content.
    Reply