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Apple Sees 350,000 Textbook Downloads in Three Days

Just last Thursday Apple announced its plans to revolutionize learning and the textbook industry with a new breed of e-textbook that offers interactive 3D objects, diagrams, videos and photos. The first of these new books are high school textbooks and are available from $14.99 through iBooks 2. While some may be skeptical of the platform's potential (after all, it does require students to first fork out for an iPad), it appears things are already going swimmingly for Apple. All Things Digital cites Global Equities Research, which monitors Apple’s iBook sales via a proprietary tracking system, in reporting that the Cupertino-based company has seen textbook downloads well in excess of 300,000 in just three days.

Global Equities Research says Apple has seen 350K textbook downloads in the three days immediately after launch, along with 90,000 downloads of iBooks Author, the application that allows users to create and publish their own books. At $15, Apple's textbooks are certainly priced for success, and, interestingly, it seems this isn't hurting the publishers that have teamed up with the company. According to GER, the supply chain markup on textbooks can be up to 35 percent because the books has to go through so many different parties before arriving in stores. This, along with the fact that the cost for producing these iBook textbooks is estimated to be 80 percent less than traditional printed textbooks, means cutting out the middle-man allows for significant savings.

Apple has not yet commented on how well textbook downloads are doing, and Global Equities Research doesn't detail how it tracks downloads, but we'll update you if we hear anything from Cupertino on this topic.

  • stingstang
    So wait...it COSTS something to make copies of a digital product? Is e-ink actually something that has to be manufactured and sold with software, or am I being appled?
    I mean tricked!
    Reply
  • stingstangSo wait...it COSTS something to make copies of a digital product? Is e-ink actually something that has to be manufactured and sold with software, or am I being appled?I mean tricked!
    Pixels don't grow off trees you know.
    Reply
  • husker
    According to the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, there are approximately 98,000 public schools in the USA. So 350,000 downloads is like 3.5 books downloaded per school. And that is only looking at US public schools. Once we factor in private schools, schools worldwide, colleges, universities, technical schools, and the School of Beauty and Hair Design, then you are spreading those 3 and half books per school over a much larger number. This is a very sparse sprinkling of downloads considering the intended market and nothing much to brag about.
    Reply
  • I prefer a physical book that i can read and flip through the pages for the night before the exams. I can't do that with an electronic tablet, its frustrating. But if the choice is between a $60 textbook or a $15 e-book, i will chose the $15 and deal with the frustration (Especially when tuition has double the last three years).
    Reply
  • xerroz
    I just wanna point out that if an author writes a book using iBooks Author and sells it using iBooks, he or she cannot legally sell that same book outside Apple's closed environment. You're locked in completely basically. As always, Apple bents people over.
    Reply
  • my nut sack is super swole
    Reply
  • @xerroz

    If that author writes a book using iBooks, then he/she should know that you can't legally sell the book outside of Apple's environment. If he/she doesn't like that, then publish then they can do it themselves with word... or whatever. At least it creates a medium for new publishes to easily penetrate rather than having to go through all those publishers and whatnot.
    Reply
  • amdfangirl
    xerrozI just wanna point out that if an author writes a book using iBooks Author and sells it using iBooks, he or she cannot legally sell that same book outside Apple's closed environment. You're locked in completely basically. As always, Apple bents people over.
    I honeslty hope schools don't make it a requirement to buy Apple products to access their textbooks. I smell monopoly.
    Reply
  • danwat1234
    I wonder how long it will take before those textbooks end up on bittorent, etc. One just has to take a screenshot of each screen, trim it and put it together into a pdf
    Reply
  • danwat1234
    I mean, you can view the textbooks on a X86 PC right?
    Reply