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LG Direct View LED takes on Samsung's The Wall with 325-inch micro-LED

LG Direct View LED
(Image credit: LG)

Not content to let Samsung have all the fun with wall-sized displays, LG has debuted its own 325-inch monster, the Direct View LED (DVLED) Extreme Home Cinema. With a room-spanning size and LG's own take on LED-as-pixel display technology, the new DVLED Extreme Home Theater looks mighty familiar, matching Samsung's The Wall right down to the exorbitant price.

But LG's new super-large home theater isn't just for the super-rich. And it won't be the ultra-thin sort of displays that LG OLED is known for. The largest 325-inch 8K model weighs in at a crushing 2,222 pounds, packing 33 million LEDs and measuring 23.6 feet wide by 13.3 feet tall. With a range of screen sizes and resolution options, the DVLED displays will also be sold in a number of pre-built sizes that don't carry the same premium prices.

The DVLED is available in several resolution options (full HD, 4K and 8K), and sizes ranging from a modest 81 inches to 215 inches for full HD, 163 to 325 inches for 4K resolution, and a single 8K model at 325 inches. They also offer several aspect ratios, from the standard 16:9 to super-wide 32:9 "Ultra Stretch" formats that double the width to that of two 2K or 4K displays side-by-side for a dual-screen effect.

LG Direct View LED

(Image credit: LG)

Like Samsung's The Wall, the new LG DVLED models use micro-LED technology to serve as individual pixels, allowing the displays to offer OLED-like contrast and black levels, pixel-perfect lighting control and ultra-bright, vibrant color that doesn't suffer from common problems like burn-in or limited viewing angles. (Check out our article Micro-LED vs. OLED TV: Which TV tech will win?)

Included with LG's luxury-class super TV is an ATA-certified flight case for storing and transporting the ultra large TV (which appears to be modular in design), a separate box that controls the custom panel configuration and offers webOS smart TV functionality, and a premium support and warranty package that includes a 5 year ExtendedCare Warranty, a 3 year TotalCare Health Check and a 3 year subscription to ConnectedCare. 

LG Direct View LED

(Image credit: LG)

Just this benefits package is estimated by LG to be worth $30,000, so if they're throwing that in for free, you're right to assume it's not something mere mortals can afford. The largest 325-inch 8K model sells for – this is not a joke – $1.7 million.

It's worth remembering that these sorts of displays are basically commercial signage that is repackaged and sold as ultra-premium home theater equipment, so things aren't exactly as straightforward as you'd get on one of the best 85-inch TVs.  Since the DVLED sets don't work like a standard TV, on-location training will be provided by an LG certified field engineer.

Sadly, we don't have any firm numbers for the smaller models, because the customizable Direct View LED (DVLED) Extreme Home Cinema has to be custom configured. But if you're in the mood for a gargantuan TV, and can afford a price that's truly obscene, you can sign up on the LG website to be contacted about getting one of your very own.

Brian Westover
Brian Westover is an Editor at Tom's Guide, covering everything from TVs to the latest PCs. Prior to joining Tom's Guide, he wrote for TopTenReviews and PCMag.