Skip to main content

Laziness FTW: This self-emptying Roomba is $300 off for Prime Day

iRobot Roomba i6+
(Image credit: iRobot)

I've been holding off on getting a robot vacuum because I know I'm going to spend as much time emptying the thing as I would using a regular vacuum. But now that the iRobot Roomba i6+ is $300 off at Amazon for Prime Day, we can all rest easy. 

This robot vacuum empties itself for up to 60 days using the included Clean Base. And once every two months or so does not sound bad at all.

iRobot Roomba i6+: was $799 now $499 @ Amazon
The Roomba i6+ is a robot vacuum that can truly make your life easier, as it can empty itself in a Clean Base for up to 60 days. This Wi-Fi connected robot maps your home and works with Alexa.

The Roomba i6+ is pretty smart, as is can intelligently map various rooms using iAdapt technology, and it works with both Google Assistant and Alexa. That means you can fire up this robot vacuum using your voice. Or you can just program a schedule using the app. 

As for cleaning power, the Roomba i6+ is sports a 3-stage cleaning system with impressive suction, whether it's riding on hard floors or carpets. And if you have pets, iRobot says the dual multi-surface rubber brushes won't get tangled with pet hair.

We tested the Roomba i7+, which is a close cousin of the i6+, and it makes our list of the best robot vacuums. In our Roomba i7+ review, we liked the very easy setup, self-emptying bin and low profile, but it sometimes got stuck. 

Be sure to check out all of the best Prime Day deals you can still get, and also visit out our Prime Day live blog for last-minute Lightning deals. 

Shop more sales at Amazon

Mark Spoonauer

Mark Spoonauer is the global editor in chief of Tom's Guide and has covered technology for nearly 20 years. In addition to overseeing the direction of Tom's Guide, Mark specializes in covering all things mobile, having reviewed dozens of smartphones and other gadgets. He has spoken at key industry events and appears regularly on TV to discuss the latest trends. Mark was previously editor in chief of Laptop Mag, and his work has appeared in Wired, Popular Science and Inc. Follow him on Twitter at @mspoonauer.