Your Health Insurance Could Make Apple Watch A Lot Cheaper

If you've been lusting after an Apple Watch but couldn't afford its high price, check your healthcare provider card. Health care benefit company Aetna announced a new plan yesterday (Sept. 28) for the company to help customers pay for an Apple Watch, as well as a new suite of apps that will help connect patients with practitioners.

Aetna's not footing the whole bill, instead it will "subsidize a significant portion" of the cost, and then offer a plan to split the remainder over a series of monthly payroll deductions. The company is planning to roll out "several iOS-exclusive health initiatives" that work cross-platform between iPhones, iPads and the Apple Watch. If you're ready to sign up, Aetna discounts on Apple Watches will begin this fall, and users can expect those apps in early 2017.

MORE: Apple Watch Series 2 Review: Better in (Almost) Every Way

Aetna's stated goal with the apps and discounted watch is to "significantly improve the ability of consumers to manage their health and increase healthy outcomes." The Aetna apps features are slated to include "care management and wellness" that will allow nurses and users with similar conditions to help users through "health events" such as a new diagnosis or prescription medication.

The always-complicated health care enrollment process is another area Aetna's apps look to simplify, as the company looks to add on-boarding, messaging and decision support, all personalized for the user. You'll even be able to check and pay for your deductibles using Apple Wallet, allowing for secure Apple Pay transactions.

Once you're registered and signed up, Aetna's apps will also provide reminders to take medications, order refills and contact your doctor to request a change in treatment.

Aetna workers eyeing Apple's wearable are even more fortunate, as the company announced it will provide the Apple Watch to its 50,000 employees at no cost.

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  • Daekar3
    And it begins. Subsidizing fitness wearables is just a step away from offering discounts for wearing them, which is just a different form of discriminating against those who don't. Better hope they don't start analyzing your health data to determine whether or not they'll pay out. They already do everything they can to avoid paying.
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