Google TV Attempting to Make Another Splash

The official Google TV blog reports that partners will be back at CES 2013 once again to showcase a new lineup of products. Google has been struggling to gain market share since the original Google TV platform launched in October 2010, marred by a lack of enthusiasm and support from content owners because they say Google doesn't do enough to curb piracy.

The 2012 show seemed promising, and so far one of the more noteworthy products stemming from the 2nd-generation Google TV platform is the Vizio Co-Star set-top box that's reasonably priced at $99.99 USD. But as we've seen over the past year, manufacturers bringing that "make any TV a Smart TV" experience to the consumer has only done so through pure Android instead of Google's TV platform.

But maybe there's hope yet in getting more Google TV out to consumers. According to Google, new arrivals like Asus, Hisense, TCL and others will show products with Google TV launching in the coming weeks. Existing partners like LG, Vizio, Sony, and others will show off the newest Google TV platform, all showcasing set-top boxes, integrated TVs, and IPTV boxes that will be available across 10 countries this year.

Back in November, Google started talking about the 3rd-generation Google TV platform, reporting that it was rolling out as an update to LG devices and then products from other partners thereafter. The platform now supports voice search, allowing viewers to hunt down movies, sports shows and other content using voice commands. The updated platform also includes PrimeTime which allows users to quickly flip through the "best stuff on live TV, access your favorite channels, see TV shows you recently watched, and find other suggestions based on what you enjoy watching."

"With the updated YouTube app for Android and Google TV, your devices automatically pair so you can play any YouTube video from your Android phone or tablet on your TV with just one button," wrote Greg Funk and Eric Liu, Product Managers. "What’s playing on your mobile device looks even better on your Google TV."

Along with new products sporting the updated Google TV platform, Amazon Instant Video, France24, Dramafever and more content apps will be on showcase so that visitors have a better understanding of what consumers will experience in 2013. These add to the hundreds of TV-optimized apps and thousands of supported mobile apps available on Google TV, Google said.

In 2010, only three products launched with Google's first-generation Google TV platform: the Sony Internet TV (four sizes), the Sony Internet TV Blu-ray Disc Player, and the Logitech Revue. Sony returned in 2012 with the Internet Player and the Internet Blu-ray Disc Player, and was accompanied by LG's SmartTV (47- and 55-inch), the Vizio Co-Star, and just recently the Hisense Pulse.

To see what the new Google TV has to offer, check out the video below. We'll try to hunt down some of these gadgets during the show to give a hands-on about what Google's TV platform has to offer.

Google TV v3

Create a new thread in the Streaming Video & TVs forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
7 comments
    Your comment
  • skaz
    Somebody has to break into this market. I'm sick of these cable companies holding back television technology.

    A simple upgrade to set top boxes would improve things dramatically. The user interface for my Comcast box is exactly the same as I remember it when I was a teenager. It amazes me every year when I search to upgrade our box and see that overall, they are the same old thing.

    Huge cable companies have the power to put a small computer in front of our televisions, but they choose not to grasp at this opportunity. Why? I'd gladly pay a little more a month for added functionality.
    6
  • bigpinkdragon286
    What the cable companies are providing is working, and at minimal cost to their upkeep. Think of the cost to roll out new equipment and services to grasp at that little more you are willing to pay when the package providers can just continue to raise the rates? From the point of view of the cable company bean counters, it's probably cheaper to stifle innovation than to pursue it. At the same time, not everybody sees the potential opportunities they have. Remember what RCA did with their liquid crystal technology opportunity? Think back to Comcast's purchase of NBC. It's already apparent to some, cable and satellite packages are an antiquated model, and who wants to be phased out as the middle man? So, I would actually expect the big companies to worry less about the little set top business and more about the content control. This article points out that there are already others who are taking up the burden of developing better set top, or built in devices, but these boxes always need two things: content, and the means to deliver that content. He who owns the content and the pipes are the ones who are going to be making the lion's share of the revenue. I wouldn't wait for your cable company to innovate.
    0
  • CaedenV
    skazSomebody has to break into this market. I'm sick of these cable companies holding back television technology. A simple upgrade to set top boxes would improve things dramatically. The user interface for my Comcast box is exactly the same as I remember it when I was a teenager. It amazes me every year when I search to upgrade our box and see that overall, they are the same old thing.Huge cable companies have the power to put a small computer in front of our televisions, but they choose not to grasp at this opportunity. Why? I'd gladly pay a little more a month for added functionality.

    The thing I have noticed when dealing cable companies out my way is that they do not want to change for fear of loosing more customers. They figure that most people of my generation or younger are moving towards streaming services that they cannot compete with on price, selection, or quality. Meanwhile, my parents generation (now in their 50s) is the TV generation who grew up on cable being the 'cool' thing to have, and they will only leave when major changes are made. It is not about what is 'easy to use' it is about educating a whole generation of die-hard cable TV addicts on how to use newer services... and if they learn the new services then they can learn how to do Netflix, Hulu, or Prime, and then there is a real fear of loosing that generation as well.
    So if they have already lost my generation, and changing things will make them loose their current customer base, then it is (sadly) best for them to keep their current model until it dies out entirely.
    0