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Best way to GPS?

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  • Windows Phone
  • PDA
  • GPS
  • Product
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Anonymous
December 5, 2004 1:16:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Greetings. I've got a Dell Axim 400, and am planning to get a new
car. The question is how best to implement navigation.

The car's built-in Nav costs $2K. I assume it's superior to
anything I can rig up with my PDA, having a larger screen and
voice commands and being much less clumsy, but with the exception
that the PDA is transportable to other vehicles.

If I go with a PDA GPS system, what's the best way to implement
it? I see the Axim has no USB port. How about the compact flash
GPS cards? I think they have their own antennae.

How about software for the PDA? What's best?

Mounting hardware for the PDA?

Your thoughts on any of these questions would be appreciated.

Paul

More about : gps

Anonymous
December 5, 2004 7:12:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

You don't say which Axim you have ( X5/X3/X30)X50?), so if it has Bluetooth,
you can get anyone of a dozen good BT receivers bundled with good software.
That will give you portabilty, not just in the car, but on foot too. Also,
this solution, while not quite as elegant as a built in, is far less
expensive. If your Axim has, instead, a CF slot, you can get a CF receiver
that will give you the same portability. Much can be learned at
www.gpspassion.com

"paul b" <pb_public@operamail.com> wrote in message
news:f796r01lld0c3f5ao1tu69qddirf055kbi@4ax.com...
> Greetings. I've got a Dell Axim 400, and am planning to get a new
> car. The question is how best to implement navigation.
>
> The car's built-in Nav costs $2K. I assume it's superior to
> anything I can rig up with my PDA, having a larger screen and
> voice commands and being much less clumsy, but with the exception
> that the PDA is transportable to other vehicles.
>
> If I go with a PDA GPS system, what's the best way to implement
> it? I see the Axim has no USB port. How about the compact flash
> GPS cards? I think they have their own antennae.
>
> How about software for the PDA? What's best?
>
> Mounting hardware for the PDA?
>
> Your thoughts on any of these questions would be appreciated.
>
> Paul
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 7:12:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Jeff Hansman wrote:

> You don't say which Axim you have ( X5/X3/X30)X50?), so if it has Bluetooth,
> you can get anyone of a dozen good BT receivers bundled with good software.
> That will give you portabilty, not just in the car, but on foot too. Also,
> this solution, while not quite as elegant as a built in, is far less
> expensive. If your Axim has, instead, a CF slot, you can get a CF receiver
> that will give you the same portability. Much can be learned at
> www.gpspassion.com


The 400 is the X5, I think; it was the more powerful of the
original two models, but it lacks bluetooth.

I found that site a bit hard to navigate, but I'm sure it's got
good info and I've bookmarked it. I did find this one-piece addon
for compact flash out on the Web:

Pharos Science Pocket GPS Portable Navigator for Dell Axim X5
PDAs (Compact Flash Card)
http://www.westcoin.com/pharospfd22.html

And also this review of it:
http://www.epinions.com/content_145806560900

Thanks,
Paul
Related resources
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 7:44:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

You have asked what has recently become a favorite topic of mine. I will
begin by advising you to save much money and go with a portable GPS system
that works with your PDA or laptop. In particular, go with a PDA that will
accommodate a compact flash or go bluetooth. I recently returned from a
trip to Montreal and Quebec where my PDA/GPS/Routis consistently matched or
outperformed the built-in navigation system in my friend's brand new Lexus.
He couldn't wait to get back home to complain to his dealer. Other reasons:
(1) portability not only among cars, but can be used afoot; (2) can be used
in Europe simply by additional software or databases--you won't be taking
your car overseas with you; (3) inexpensive to update over time compared to
system built-in car. Like cell phones, built-in navigations will become
commonplace in cars. So the argument that they will boost the resale value
significantly is bogus. You will never recover but a fraction of the
original cost. At that point it will be reasonable to have one in your car
and one you can carry around as well.
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 7:59:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I would go for the built in GPS system.
Today i have a Garmin handheld gps and it works fine but the new built in
gps i got with my new car is even better.
It also looks better.

If you have the money, go for the built in, it gives the car better second
hand price also.

"paul b" <pb_public@operamail.com> skrev i meddelandet
news:f796r01lld0c3f5ao1tu69qddirf055kbi@4ax.com...
> Greetings. I've got a Dell Axim 400, and am planning to get a new
> car. The question is how best to implement navigation.
>
> The car's built-in Nav costs $2K. I assume it's superior to
> anything I can rig up with my PDA, having a larger screen and
> voice commands and being much less clumsy, but with the exception
> that the PDA is transportable to other vehicles.
>
> If I go with a PDA GPS system, what's the best way to implement
> it? I see the Axim has no USB port. How about the compact flash
> GPS cards? I think they have their own antennae.
>
> How about software for the PDA? What's best?
>
> Mounting hardware for the PDA?
>
> Your thoughts on any of these questions would be appreciated.
>
> Paul
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 7:59:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

eS^ wrote:

> If you have the money, go for the built in, it gives the car better second
> hand price also.

That is an important point. It's not like the $2K is entirely
thrown away. It seems the built-in has every advantage over the
PDA except initial cost and lack of portability.

Paul
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:22:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

paul b wrote:
> Greetings. I've got a Dell Axim 400, and am planning to get a new
> car. The question is how best to implement navigation.
>
> The car's built-in Nav costs $2K. I assume it's superior to
> anything I can rig up with my PDA, having a larger screen and
> voice commands and being much less clumsy, but with the exception
> that the PDA is transportable to other vehicles.
>
> If I go with a PDA GPS system, what's the best way to implement
> it? I see the Axim has no USB port. How about the compact flash
> GPS cards? I think they have their own antennae.
>
> How about software for the PDA? What's best?
>
> Mounting hardware for the PDA?
>
> Your thoughts on any of these questions would be appreciated.
>
> Paul

In-car systems are not better in every sense. The best PocketPC systems
have support for custom POI overlays such as Safety Cameras and a vast range
of others. They can also be transferred between vehicles easily and be
upgraded with newer and better software simply.

Pay our site a visit to see what's what. FWIW my last car, a Jaguar had
factory fit Nav and it was inferior when compared to my PocketPC set-up. I
chose not to specify Nav in my Land Rover for this very reason and have
saved $4000+!

--
Darren Griffin
PocketGPSWorld - www.pocketgpsworld.com
The Premier GPS Resource for News, Reviews and Forums
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:22:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Darren Griffin - PocketGPSWorld wrote:

> In-car systems are not better in every sense. The best PocketPC systems
> have support for custom POI overlays such as Safety Cameras and a vast range
> of others. They can also be transferred between vehicles easily and be
> upgraded with newer and better software simply.
>
> Pay our site a visit to see what's what. FWIW my last car, a Jaguar had
> factory fit Nav and it was inferior when compared to my PocketPC set-up. I
> chose not to specify Nav in my Land Rover for this very reason and have
> saved $4000+!
>
> --
> Darren Griffin
> PocketGPSWorld - www.pocketgpsworld.com


Thanks, Darren. Very nice site. After reviewing it, while I
appreciate some of the features you mention above, I'm thinking
the subject is too complex for what I'm willing to get into right
now, and that the built-in unit probably would be better for me
at this time. It would seem that my original basic question is
being answered.

Paul
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:40:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Try Alk's Co-pilot www.alk.com
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:40:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

twynkoop@cox.net wrote:

> Try Alk's Co-pilot www.alk.com

This is tempting, for $300 it seems to include everything except,
presumably, a car PDA holder. Any experience with the setup, and
if so with which PDA?

Paul
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 8:40:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Try the axim users site:

www.aximsite.com

They have a forum for each model axim, and one for GPS. I use the
TomTom System with TT bluetooth GPS. I prefer this to a built in, as
I travel to Europe often, and can take my GPS with me.
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 10:57:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Mel Moy wrote:

> You have asked what has recently become a favorite topic of mine. I will
> begin by advising you to save much money and go with a portable GPS system
> that works with your PDA or laptop. In particular, go with a PDA that will
> accommodate a compact flash or go bluetooth. I recently returned from a
> trip to Montreal and Quebec where my PDA/GPS/Routis consistently matched or
> outperformed the built-in navigation system in my friend's brand new Lexus.

Wild. What setup do you use? Is it convenient for a lone driver?
Was it hard to rig?

> Other reasons:
> (1) portability not only among cars, but can be used afoot; (2) can be used
> in Europe simply by additional software or databases--you won't be taking
> your car overseas with you; (3) inexpensive to update over time compared to
> system built-in car.

Agree to all.

> Like cell phones, built-in navigations will become
> commonplace in cars. So the argument that they will boost the resale value
> significantly is bogus. You will never recover but a fraction of the
> original cost. At that point it will be reasonable to have one in your car
> and one you can carry around as well.

The point was that at least you will be able to recover some of
the $2K outlay, not all of it. Built-in will never be as
inexpensive as handheld, especially considering the PDA has other
functions. Counterbalancing that though, the DVD-based built-in
can be used to play DVDs.

Paul
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 11:02:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Mike_NYC wrote:

> Try the axim users site:
>
> www.aximsite.com
>
> They have a forum for each model axim, and one for GPS. I use the
> TomTom System with TT bluetooth GPS. I prefer this to a built in, as
> I travel to Europe often, and can take my GPS with me.

Excellent resource. Will definitely give this more thought.
Thanks much.

Paul
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 12:57:23 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Mike_NYC wrote:

> Try the axim users site:
>
> www.aximsite.com
>
> They have a forum for each model axim, and one for GPS. I use the
> TomTom System with TT bluetooth GPS. I prefer this to a built in, as
> I travel to Europe often, and can take my GPS with me.

Tons of info there, including great links. Beginning to get a
feel for it now.

Paul
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 5:35:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Don't forget the Mio 168, it also has built in GPS and it's a PocketPC.

FYI: Forget about hearing or seeing the screen of your PDA in a convertable!

--
Bob D.

"eS^" <es@removethis.bredband.net> wrote in message
news:uyQjfNu2EHA.1392@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>I would go for the built in GPS system.
> Today i have a Garmin handheld gps and it works fine but the new built in
> gps i got with my new car is even better.
> It also looks better.
>
> If you have the money, go for the built in, it gives the car better second
> hand price also.
>
> "paul b" <pb_public@operamail.com> skrev i meddelandet
> news:f796r01lld0c3f5ao1tu69qddirf055kbi@4ax.com...
>> Greetings. I've got a Dell Axim 400, and am planning to get a new
>> car. The question is how best to implement navigation.
>>
>> The car's built-in Nav costs $2K. I assume it's superior to
>> anything I can rig up with my PDA, having a larger screen and
>> voice commands and being much less clumsy, but with the exception
>> that the PDA is transportable to other vehicles.
>>
>> If I go with a PDA GPS system, what's the best way to implement
>> it? I see the Axim has no USB port. How about the compact flash
>> GPS cards? I think they have their own antennae.
>>
>> How about software for the PDA? What's best?
>>
>> Mounting hardware for the PDA?
>>
>> Your thoughts on any of these questions would be appreciated.
>>
>> Paul
>
>
December 6, 2004 11:39:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I have that same Axim, and I just bought a GPS system for it. I tend
to fixate on researching this sort of thing, and for my needs, the
Deluo Routis was the best choice. It worked on both my Axim and my
laptop.

I just went to check on a link for you, but apparently, right after I
bought it, they stopped selling Routis. One of my other criteria was
that I wanted it to speak the directions so I wouldn't have to look at
the screen. Well, in hindsight, I always look at it anyway, so the
speech thing is only handy when I'm on the phone or daydreaming, and
it serves as a reminder to look at the screen.

The other one I almost bought was a CF version with TomTom Navigator.
That may be the best bet. This way, if you decide to go with a
different PDA inthe future, you can utilize the GPS in the new one.
Although the new PDA would mostlikely have bluetooth in it, in which
case the CF card would be antiquated. *shrug*

It's a tough call. Personally, if I were buying a new car anyway, and
the option for a GPS were there, I'd go that route. Easier all around.
Sure, you're literally paying 10 times as much, but it is $2000 spread
out over payments, probably covered under warranty, no extra wires and
used lighter outlets cluttering up the car, and you get the resale
value.

John
On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 11:45:49 -0500, "paul b" <pb_public@operamail.com>
wrote:

>Jeff Hansman wrote:
>
>> You don't say which Axim you have ( X5/X3/X30)X50?), so if it has Bluetooth,
>> you can get anyone of a dozen good BT receivers bundled with good software.
>> That will give you portabilty, not just in the car, but on foot too. Also,
>> this solution, while not quite as elegant as a built in, is far less
>> expensive. If your Axim has, instead, a CF slot, you can get a CF receiver
>> that will give you the same portability. Much can be learned at
>> www.gpspassion.com
>
>
>The 400 is the X5, I think; it was the more powerful of the
>original two models, but it lacks bluetooth.
>
>I found that site a bit hard to navigate, but I'm sure it's got
>good info and I've bookmarked it. I did find this one-piece addon
>for compact flash out on the Web:
>
>Pharos Science Pocket GPS Portable Navigator for Dell Axim X5
>PDAs (Compact Flash Card)
>http://www.westcoin.com/pharospfd22.html
>
>And also this review of it:
>http://www.epinions.com/content_145806560900
>
>Thanks,
>Paul
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 11:39:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

None@none.tv wrote:

> I have that same Axim, and I just bought a GPS system for it. I tend
> to fixate on researching this sort of thing, and for my needs, the
> Deluo Routis was the best choice. It worked on both my Axim and my
> laptop.
>
> I just went to check on a link for you, but apparently, right after I
> bought it, they stopped selling Routis. One of my other criteria was
> that I wanted it to speak the directions so I wouldn't have to look at
> the screen. Well, in hindsight, I always look at it anyway, so the
> speech thing is only handy when I'm on the phone or daydreaming, and
> it serves as a reminder to look at the screen.
>
> The other one I almost bought was a CF version with TomTom Navigator.
> That may be the best bet. This way, if you decide to go with a
> different PDA inthe future, you can utilize the GPS in the new one.
> Although the new PDA would mostlikely have bluetooth in it, in which
> case the CF card would be antiquated. *shrug*
>
> It's a tough call. Personally, if I were buying a new car anyway, and
> the option for a GPS were there, I'd go that route. Easier all around.
> Sure, you're literally paying 10 times as much, but it is $2000 spread
> out over payments, probably covered under warranty, no extra wires and
> used lighter outlets cluttering up the car, and you get the resale
> value.
>
> John

Thanks for the feedback. the Axim user site had a link to a
comparison between the Routis and Mapopolis, and according to
that one man's opinion, Mapopolis won very handily. But what do I
know?

Now that I know the basics of how to put a system together, I'm
going to wait until I order the car and see what the bottom line
is. One thing the built-in unit still has over the PDA: a large
screen.

Paul
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 6:29:00 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

IMHO, talking GPS is the only way to go! I just punch up my destination on
my Mio 168, and turn when it says to turn. You can't imagine how liberating
it is to drive without worrying where you are or when to turn. Sometimes I
deliberately go off course just for the scenery. The Mio recalculates the
route automatically, and always gets me where I'm going.

Two FYIs:

Contrary to what some say, the TFT displays on PDAs are useless in
direct sunlight. (And still not so good in the shade, like in a car.) Even
with good visibility, the driver shouldn't take his eyes off the road. GPS
should be heard, not seen (at least in a car).

PDAs aren't very loud. If you drive with the top or windows down, you
will need to patch your PDA into your radio for extra volume.

--
Bob D.

<None@none.tv> wrote in message
news:vof9r0lsodlnsbmjl4052mqa29apiqs1gb@4ax.com...
>I have that same Axim, and I just bought a GPS system for it. I tend
> to fixate on researching this sort of thing, and for my needs, the
> Deluo Routis was the best choice. It worked on both my Axim and my
> laptop.
>
> I just went to check on a link for you, but apparently, right after I
> bought it, they stopped selling Routis. One of my other criteria was
> that I wanted it to speak the directions so I wouldn't have to look at
> the screen. Well, in hindsight, I always look at it anyway, so the
> speech thing is only handy when I'm on the phone or daydreaming, and
> it serves as a reminder to look at the screen.
>
> The other one I almost bought was a CF version with TomTom Navigator.
> That may be the best bet. This way, if you decide to go with a
> different PDA inthe future, you can utilize the GPS in the new one.
> Although the new PDA would mostlikely have bluetooth in it, in which
> case the CF card would be antiquated. *shrug*
>
> It's a tough call. Personally, if I were buying a new car anyway, and
> the option for a GPS were there, I'd go that route. Easier all around.
> Sure, you're literally paying 10 times as much, but it is $2000 spread
> out over payments, probably covered under warranty, no extra wires and
> used lighter outlets cluttering up the car, and you get the resale
> value.
>
> John
> On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 11:45:49 -0500, "paul b" <pb_public@operamail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Jeff Hansman wrote:
>>
>>> You don't say which Axim you have ( X5/X3/X30)X50?), so if it has
>>> Bluetooth,
>>> you can get anyone of a dozen good BT receivers bundled with good
>>> software.
>>> That will give you portabilty, not just in the car, but on foot too.
>>> Also,
>>> this solution, while not quite as elegant as a built in, is far less
>>> expensive. If your Axim has, instead, a CF slot, you can get a CF
>>> receiver
>>> that will give you the same portability. Much can be learned at
>>> www.gpspassion.com
>>
>>
>>The 400 is the X5, I think; it was the more powerful of the
>>original two models, but it lacks bluetooth.
>>
>>I found that site a bit hard to navigate, but I'm sure it's got
>>good info and I've bookmarked it. I did find this one-piece addon
>>for compact flash out on the Web:
>>
>>Pharos Science Pocket GPS Portable Navigator for Dell Axim X5
>>PDAs (Compact Flash Card)
>>http://www.westcoin.com/pharospfd22.html
>>
>>And also this review of it:
>>http://www.epinions.com/content_145806560900
>>
>>Thanks,
>>Paul
>
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 6:29:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I saw a FM transmitter in CompuUSA last week that allows you broadcast
audio from your PocketPC to the FM radio in your car.

Bob D. wrote:

> IMHO, talking GPS is the only way to go! I just punch up my destination on
> my Mio 168, and turn when it says to turn. You can't imagine how liberating
> it is to drive without worrying where you are or when to turn. Sometimes I
> deliberately go off course just for the scenery. The Mio recalculates the
> route automatically, and always gets me where I'm going.
>
> Two FYIs:
>
> Contrary to what some say, the TFT displays on PDAs are useless in
> direct sunlight. (And still not so good in the shade, like in a car.) Even
> with good visibility, the driver shouldn't take his eyes off the road. GPS
> should be heard, not seen (at least in a car).
>
> PDAs aren't very loud. If you drive with the top or windows down, you
> will need to patch your PDA into your radio for extra volume.
>
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 4:13:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Yeah, I've got one. They work pretty well.

Cheers - Neil

On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 22:37:37 -0500, "David C. Holley"
<DavidCHolley@netscape.net> wrote:

>I saw a FM transmitter in CompuUSA last week that allows you broadcast
>audio from your PocketPC to the FM radio in your car.
>
>Bob D. wrote:
>
>> IMHO, talking GPS is the only way to go! I just punch up my destination on
>> my Mio 168, and turn when it says to turn. You can't imagine how liberating
>> it is to drive without worrying where you are or when to turn. Sometimes I
>> deliberately go off course just for the scenery. The Mio recalculates the
>> route automatically, and always gets me where I'm going.
>>
>> Two FYIs:
>>
>> Contrary to what some say, the TFT displays on PDAs are useless in
>> direct sunlight. (And still not so good in the shade, like in a car.) Even
>> with good visibility, the driver shouldn't take his eyes off the road. GPS
>> should be heard, not seen (at least in a car).
>>
>> PDAs aren't very loud. If you drive with the top or windows down, you
>> will need to patch your PDA into your radio for extra volume.
>>
December 9, 2004 11:19:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 17:54:43 -0500, "paul b" <pb_public@operamail.com>
wrote:

>None@none.tv wrote:
>
>> I have that same Axim, and I just bought a GPS system for it. I tend
>> to fixate on researching this sort of thing, and for my needs, the
>> Deluo Routis was the best choice. It worked on both my Axim and my
>> laptop.
>>
>> I just went to check on a link for you, but apparently, right after I
>> bought it, they stopped selling Routis. One of my other criteria was
>> that I wanted it to speak the directions so I wouldn't have to look at
>> the screen. Well, in hindsight, I always look at it anyway, so the
>> speech thing is only handy when I'm on the phone or daydreaming, and
>> it serves as a reminder to look at the screen.
>>
>> The other one I almost bought was a CF version with TomTom Navigator.
>> That may be the best bet. This way, if you decide to go with a
>> different PDA inthe future, you can utilize the GPS in the new one.
>> Although the new PDA would mostlikely have bluetooth in it, in which
>> case the CF card would be antiquated. *shrug*
>>
>> It's a tough call. Personally, if I were buying a new car anyway, and
>> the option for a GPS were there, I'd go that route. Easier all around.
>> Sure, you're literally paying 10 times as much, but it is $2000 spread
>> out over payments, probably covered under warranty, no extra wires and
>> used lighter outlets cluttering up the car, and you get the resale
>> value.
>>
>> John
>
>Thanks for the feedback. the Axim user site had a link to a
>comparison between the Routis and Mapopolis, and according to
>that one man's opinion, Mapopolis won very handily. But what do I
>know?
>
>Now that I know the basics of how to put a system together, I'm
>going to wait until I order the car and see what the bottom line
>is. One thing the built-in unit still has over the PDA: a large
>screen.
>
>Paul

I did just find out that Routis is no longer available. Really though,
as for the screen, at least on Routis (my only experience), the size
isn't really an issue. I leave it zoomed out while on the highway for
example, but it automatically zooms in when a turn is coming up. When
you've taken the turn, it zooms out again.

John
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 11:20:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

None@none.tv wrote:

>> One thing the built-in unit still has over the PDA: a large
>> screen.


> as for the screen, at least on Routis (my only experience), the size
> isn't really an issue. I leave it zoomed out while on the highway for
> example, but it automatically zooms in when a turn is coming up. When
> you've taken the turn, it zooms out again.


Thanks, that's good to know. Now to scrape the cash together for
the car!

Paul
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 7:54:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Also see http://www.gpspassion.com and the microsoft.public.streets-trips
newsgroup.

--
Please respond to the Newsgroup for the benefit of others who may be
interested. Questions sent directly to me will only be answered on a paid
consulting basis.

Hope this helps,
Doug Robbins - Word MVP
"paul b" <pb_public@operamail.com> wrote in message
news:9sb7r09i6c8vmoo0c0c53di7ihcskgqriq@4ax.com...
> Mike_NYC wrote:
>
>> Try the axim users site:
>>
>> www.aximsite.com
>>
>> They have a forum for each model axim, and one for GPS. I use the
>> TomTom System with TT bluetooth GPS. I prefer this to a built in, as
>> I travel to Europe often, and can take my GPS with me.
>
> Excellent resource. Will definitely give this more thought.
> Thanks much.
>
> Paul
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 11:05:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I haven't seen one in our CompUSA in months, but I bought one
from them last year. I can't recall right now when $30 was
spent in a better way.

--
TCPW
The Miniature Mage


"Neil Smith [MVP Digital Media]" <neil@nospam.com> wrote in
message news:94cbr0lo75d99pco5kh0o4kufrvk9v798r@4ax.com...
> Yeah, I've got one. They work pretty well.
>
> Cheers - Neil
>
> On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 22:37:37 -0500, "David C. Holley"
> <DavidCHolley@netscape.net> wrote:
>
>>I saw a FM transmitter in CompuUSA last week that allows you
>>broadcast
>>audio from your PocketPC to the FM radio in your car.
>>
>>Bob D. wrote:
>>
>>> IMHO, talking GPS is the only way to go! I just punch up my
>>> destination on
>>> my Mio 168, and turn when it says to turn. You can't imagine
>>> how liberating
>>> it is to drive without worrying where you are or when to
>>> turn. Sometimes I
>>> deliberately go off course just for the scenery. The Mio
>>> recalculates the
>>> route automatically, and always gets me where I'm going.
>>>
>>> Two FYIs:
>>>
>>> Contrary to what some say, the TFT displays on PDAs are
>>> useless in
>>> direct sunlight. (And still not so good in the shade, like in
>>> a car.) Even
>>> with good visibility, the driver shouldn't take his eyes off
>>> the road. GPS
>>> should be heard, not seen (at least in a car).
>>>
>>> PDAs aren't very loud. If you drive with the top or
>>> windows down, you
>>> will need to patch your PDA into your radio for extra volume.
>>>
>
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 3:42:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Doug Robbins wrote:

> Also see http://www.gpspassion.com and the microsoft.public.streets-trips
> newsgroup.

Thanks, Doug. I had come across the gpspassion site.

Paul
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