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In simple terms - how to unlock Athlon

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  • AMD
  • Unlock
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Rooting, Jailbreaking & Unlocking
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 23, 2004 3:02:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

OK, I want to unlock my athlon XP processor so I can turn it DOWN
dynamically so under normal windows conditions it will run cooler.

Is there a way to do this without soldering, or tampering with the chip? I
hear people talking about cutting bridges, or joining bridges with graphite
from a pencil. Research on the web turns up so much contradictory
information, I don't know what is right, so I haven't tried it in case I
damage my chip.

I did try joining the bridges on an older athlon 1800+ once, but it didn't
make any difference, so I presumed the advice was wrong (or the pencil was
no good!).

I believe I have a Thoroughbred Athlon XP 2400+ currently runing at the
standard 15x133 = 2000MHz. I have a Soltek SL75-DRV5 motherboard. On my
laptop I run software that slows down the CPU when it is not under load. It
lets you dynamically change the voltage, FSB and multiplier. The options to
change these settings are not available on my desktop PC, so I presume the
processor is locked??

Any (easy) advice welcome.
Thanks

More about : simple terms unlock athlon

Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 23, 2004 5:15:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"Gareth Tuckwell" <ContactGT@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:q3y4d.81$w81.24@newsfe2-gui.ntli.net...

" I believe I have a Thoroughbred Athlon XP 2400+ currently runing at the
standard 15x133 = 2000MHz... ...The options to change these settings are
not available on my desktop PC, so I presume the processor is locked?? "


Wire-mod. http://home.hawaii.rr.com/leeb18509/socket.jpg

Use CrystalCPUID (or similar). http://crystalmark.info/download-e.html
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 23, 2004 5:15:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

CrystalCPUID is the program I was trying to run, but I don't get the option
of changing the speed on my desktop system!

If I stick a little bit of wire in the holes shown on that diagram
(http://home.hawaii.rr.com/leeb18509/socket.jpg) what will happen?? I don't
want to damage the CPU or the motherboard?!!?

Can one little bit of wire like that unlock my athlon??
Would that work also for the athlon 1800+ in my other PC?




"Cuzman" <cuzNOSPAM@supanet.com> wrote in message
news:2rft3mF1937hcU1@uni-berlin.de...
> "Gareth Tuckwell" <ContactGT@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:q3y4d.81$w81.24@newsfe2-gui.ntli.net...
>
> " I believe I have a Thoroughbred Athlon XP 2400+ currently runing at the
> standard 15x133 = 2000MHz... ...The options to change these settings are
> not available on my desktop PC, so I presume the processor is locked?? "
>
>
> Wire-mod. http://home.hawaii.rr.com/leeb18509/socket.jpg
>
> Use CrystalCPUID (or similar). http://crystalmark.info/download-e.html
>
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 24, 2004 1:29:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Thu, 23 Sep 2004 11:02:46 +0000, Gareth Tuckwell wrote:

> OK, I want to unlock my athlon XP processor so I can turn it DOWN
> dynamically so under normal windows conditions it will run cooler.
>
You don't have to unlock it to do that.

> Is there a way to do this without soldering, or tampering with the chip?

Go into bios, lower FSB to 100MHz and lower vcore as low as it will go and
still run stable. BTw, lowering vcore is what will cool it down the most
by a large margin.

> I hear people talking about cutting bridges, or joining bridges with
> graphite from a pencil. Research on the web turns up so much
> contradictory information, I don't know what is right, so I haven't
> tried it in case I damage my chip.
>
Forget it, you don't need to do this to lower the speed.

> I did try joining the bridges on an older athlon 1800+ once, but it
> didn't make any difference, so I presumed the advice was wrong (or the
> pencil was no good!).
>
Pencils don't work on XP's.

> I believe I have a Thoroughbred Athlon XP 2400+ currently runing at the
> standard 15x133 = 2000MHz. I have a Soltek SL75-DRV5 motherboard.

Assuming you can change the FSB and vcore in bios, set fsb to 100 and
vcore to 1.50v. Test for stabilty at 1500MHz with these settings. If it's
not stable, raise vcore a little til it is.

> On my laptop I run software that slows down the CPU when it is not under
> load. It lets you dynamically change the voltage, FSB and multiplier.
> The options to change these settings are not available on my desktop PC,
> so I presume the processor is locked??
>
That's not an indicator of a locked CPU. BTW, locked only refers to the
multiplier. FSB and vcores have never been locked. You might be able to
find software that will allow changes to these on the desktop. It's not
impossible.


--
Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 24, 2004 12:57:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Thanks for that Wes.

I was hoping to lower the speed of the processor only by reducing the
multiplier, therefore keeping my graphics card and memory at the faster
setting. I know I can lower the FSB and voltage (running at 1.575v instead
of 1.65v already), but I have already tried this...

My motherboard (Soltek SL75-DRV5) allows fsb from 100 to 250 in 2 ranges -
100 to 132 and 133 to 250. There is a jumper on the motherboard to change
this range. At either setting with defaults, the computer runs just fine. At
the higher setting I can get the FSB up to about 138-139 without upping the
voltage, but at the lower range I can't set the FSB to 132, the PC won't
boot - reset BIOS required!! Anyone idea why??? I planned to go to 132, then
work downwards until I was happy with the temperature, but as this didn't
work I decided to use the multiplier instead.

If I could turn the processor speed down from 2000 to maybe 1850 + reduce
the voltage also, I recon it would run quite a bit cooler, but I want to do
this with the multiplier and keep the FSB at 133 or even higher - maybe 166
(my memory can handle that).

Basically I want to unlock the multiplier, but I don't want to tamper with
the CPU to achieve it!


"Wes Newell" <w.newell@TAKEOUTverizon.net> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.09.23.21.34.47.965666@TAKEOUTverizon.net...
> On Thu, 23 Sep 2004 11:02:46 +0000, Gareth Tuckwell wrote:
>
>> OK, I want to unlock my athlon XP processor so I can turn it DOWN
>> dynamically so under normal windows conditions it will run cooler.
>>
> You don't have to unlock it to do that.
>
>> Is there a way to do this without soldering, or tampering with the chip?
>
> Go into bios, lower FSB to 100MHz and lower vcore as low as it will go and
> still run stable. BTw, lowering vcore is what will cool it down the most
> by a large margin.
>
>> I hear people talking about cutting bridges, or joining bridges with
>> graphite from a pencil. Research on the web turns up so much
>> contradictory information, I don't know what is right, so I haven't
>> tried it in case I damage my chip.
>>
> Forget it, you don't need to do this to lower the speed.
>
>> I did try joining the bridges on an older athlon 1800+ once, but it
>> didn't make any difference, so I presumed the advice was wrong (or the
>> pencil was no good!).
>>
> Pencils don't work on XP's.
>
>> I believe I have a Thoroughbred Athlon XP 2400+ currently runing at the
>> standard 15x133 = 2000MHz. I have a Soltek SL75-DRV5 motherboard.
>
> Assuming you can change the FSB and vcore in bios, set fsb to 100 and
> vcore to 1.50v. Test for stabilty at 1500MHz with these settings. If it's
> not stable, raise vcore a little til it is.
>
>> On my laptop I run software that slows down the CPU when it is not under
>> load. It lets you dynamically change the voltage, FSB and multiplier.
>> The options to change these settings are not available on my desktop PC,
>> so I presume the processor is locked??
>>
> That's not an indicator of a locked CPU. BTW, locked only refers to the
> multiplier. FSB and vcores have never been locked. You might be able to
> find software that will allow changes to these on the desktop. It's not
> impossible.
>
>
> --
> Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
> http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 24, 2004 9:20:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Fri, 24 Sep 2004 08:57:14 +0000, Gareth Tuckwell wrote:

> Basically I want to unlock the multiplier, but I don't want to tamper with
> the CPU to achieve it!
>
Your 2400+ is either already unlocked, or it's a later model (made after
0338) that's internally locked. the L1 bridges are closed on both models.
There's no way to unlock any multiplier locked cpu without messing with
the bridges, and the later locked models IMO involves way too much to
even be worth messing with.

--
Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 24, 2004 9:21:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Gareth Tuckwell wrote:
> CrystalCPUID is the program I was trying to run, but I don't get the
> option of changing the speed on my desktop system!

This is quite a different issue than your CPU being locked. In your case,
you want PowerNow capability, which is AMD's
change-the-multiplier-and-voltage-on-the-fly thing. It's somewhat
complicated to get going on a desktop chip, and most desktop motherboard do
not support voltage changes in this manner. I've got some details at:
http://www.emboss.co.nz/amdunlock/
(the URL has nothing to do with my first sentence :)  )
though there's many other guides out there as well. In your particular case,
you're wanting the OS to automagically step down the CPU when it's under
load. This presents some additional issues, as if you follow many of the
guides out there you'll end up with the maximum multiplier being 24x. This
means that when the load on the CPU increases, the OS will try and change
the multiplier to 24x (ie: it will lock up). The solution to this is to
either set the maximum multiplier manually using the L6 bridges, or take the
easier software route and used a patched AMDK7.SYS driver. An additional
problem is that the BIOS may try and set it to the maximum software
multiplier on boot. This can be fixed by patching the BIOS (or again,
setting the L6's to what you want).

> If I stick a little bit of wire in the holes shown on that diagram
> (http://home.hawaii.rr.com/leeb18509/socket.jpg) what will happen??

It won't do anything. (see below)

> I don't want to damage the CPU or the motherboard?!!?
>
> Can one little bit of wire like that unlock my athlon??

No. There's three states an Athlon can be in
1) Unlocked. You can change the multiplier using pin painting, etc to
whatever you want.
2) Locked by AMD severing the L1 bridges. Multiplier adjustments through pin
painting, BIOS settings, etc will have no effect. You have to rejoin the L1
bridges, which changes the CPU into state 1 (ie: full multiplier control).
3) Locked by AMD storing the multiplier inside the die. Multiplier
adjustments through pin painting, BIOS settings, etc will have no effect.
There is nothing you can do to this CPU to enable pin-painting/BIOS
multiplier changes.

The 1-pin "unlocking" trick is an unfortunate myth that started out with
several review sites when the XP2100 came out. This was the first CPU to use
the 5th multiplier bit (it had a multiplier of 13.0x, and the 4-bit range
stopped at 12.5x), and no boards at the time could change this 5th bit.
Since changing the multiplier to something in the BIOS resulted in the use
of a much higher multiplier, and the 2100 core was already being pushed to
the limit, the CPU wouldn't boot if the multiplier was changed. They assumed
that the CPU was locked in some way.

The myth started when sites who didn't know what they were doing (despite
detailed information being around at the time) started messing around with
the bridges trying to make them the same as the XP2000 CPU. This resulted in
them finding, pretty much through blind luck, a combination that made it
boot at a multiplier in the 6.0x to 12.5x range, at which point they could
use the multiplier controls in the BIOS again to choose a multiplier in the
6.0x to 12.5x range. Eventually the method was "refined", and the minimum
change found (the change of the 5th multiplier bit only). Someone who
actually knew what was going on pointed out that this was the case, and that
an identical result could be gained by just painting the corresponding
BP_FID fin. This then became known as the "unlocking pin" of the Athlon XP,
despite it having nothing to do with unlocking the CPU.

The myth unfortunately has never died. There's a multitude of reasons why,
not least that several companies (SpeedStrip for example) make products the
"unlock" Athlons. These products DO NOT unlock Athlons in any way. If the
CPU is locked (ie: states 1 or 3) then the product does nothing. If the CPU
is in the 2nd state, then the product just changes the 5th multiplier bit to
the "low" range.

But anyhow, I think I should stop ranting. Basically, the one-pin/bridge
unclocking trick is a myth perputrated by people who have never heard of
Fab51 and who don't know what they're talking about. If anyone claims that
it unlocks the CPU, treat any other advice from them as similar quality.

> Would that work also for the athlon 1800+ in my other PC?

The 1800+ will be locked (as presumably the L1 bridges were cut if you tried
to join them :)  ). To get BIOS/pin-painting multiplier controls on this you
will need to fill in then rejoin the L1's with conductive paint. A similar
trick will work with the L5's to enable PowerNow, but I beleive there's
slightly more of an issue when setting the maximum (and default) software
multiplier and voltage. I'd have to look into it a bit more to be sure.

[...]

--
Michael Brown
www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
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