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Laptop upgrades: CPU and GPU usually cannot be upgraded or replaced

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  • Upgrade
  • GPUs
  • Notebooks
  • CPUs
Last response: in Laptop Tech Support
a b à CPUs
January 18, 2016 12:11:41 PM

I have frequently seen questions about "How can I upgrade the CPU in my laptop" or "What graphics card should I get with my laptop so I can upgrade it later?" In most cases, these upgrades cannot be done.

o Almost all notebooks do not have "graphics cards" the way a desktop machine has. They either use the onboard graphics on the CPU and passed through the chipset, or have a graphics chip attached to the motherboard.

o In the case of onboard graphics for Intel, your Device Manager will show something like "Intel(R) 915GM/GMS, 910GML Express Chip Set." This is integrated into the CPU and the motherboard's chipset, does not exist as a physically separate object, and can't be changed.

o In the case of a separate graphics chip, the motherboard is highly customized for this particular chip. It may be compatible with no other chip, or a small number of chips in the same family.

o There is one other case, known as MXM, which I will discuss later.

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o Whether or not the CPU and / or GPU chip can be replaced depends on two things. First, in many cases they are soldered to the motherboard and cannot be removed. Second, if they are socketed, only a small number of chips will be compatible with the motherboard, and you probably won't be able to substitute a chip with higher power consumption; the motherboard may not be able to provide it.

o Socketed machines tend to be both more expensive and uncommon. Anyone who can provide a link to examples, especially not-expensive ones, please PM me so that I can update this.

o Motherboards are highly customized for the particular machine. Its case, its power supply, the intended CPU and, if present, GPU, the display. Unlike a desktop motherboard, you cannot simply pull out the motherboard and drop in a new one. There will be some limited interchangeability within similar models from the same maker.

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o The exception mentioned above is the MXM, or Mobile PCI Express module. If a notebook machine supports an MXM card, you can use an MXM graphics card. In this case, the machine will actually have a separate graphics card, not the configurations that I described above. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_PCI_Express_Module .

As above, if you can provide a link to an example please PM me. Here is one: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/msi-gt80s-titan-sli...

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As far as other components go.

o The hard drive / SSD is usually simple to replace, but this will depend on the machine.
o The memory is relatively easy to replace, but laptops do not take regular desktop memory. Their are more compatibility issues with laptop memory than with desktop memory. I personally stick to memory I got through the manufacturer.
o Screen replacement. This is a contentious topic. I will say that it's possible, it's quite difficult, and you have to find one of the very few screens that will be compatible with your machine.

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Note that technically a soldered-on chip can be replaced with one compatible with the same motherboard, either to replace a failed one or upgrade within a small range. However, this requires very expensive soldering equipment and much experience, and may be more expensive than replacement. Most repair shops will choose to put in a complete replacement motherboard.

More about : laptop upgrades cpu gpu upgraded replaced

a c 320 à CPUs
January 18, 2016 9:04:19 PM

Great stickey WyomingKnott!
March 7, 2016 6:14:29 AM

It definitely depends on the laptop. The Toshiba Qosmio X70-A, does allow the user to upgrade both CPU and GPU, but there's always the question of any extra heat these newer cards might create as any extra heat is usually really bad news for a laptop. It is generally the high end Gaming Laptops, that will allow these types of upgrades. One thing to add, never try to Overclock a laptop it will 99% of the time end in tears. (Waisted money, because laptop got too hot and fried) The way to approach buying a laptop is : 1. Work out what exactly you indend too do on your laptop. 2. Find out your cheapest options to achieving these goals. 3. Set a Maximum budget. 4. Buy the best Laptop your budget will allow. 5. Understand that most laptops last 2 - 3 years at the most and by the time you walk out the shop, there will be a new laptop with extra bells and whistles. 6. *Stick to your BUDGET and do your research! 7. Be careful of things like Renting, unless it is tax deductible like part business use! As when renting it is never fully yours. 8. Think about where it will be good value for money, or is a desktop or All-in-one better? 9. Sales People sometimes can bamboozle you with too much information, if unsure, give yourself 24 hours to think about it, look on internet at model, read reviews, then if all ok, then go back the following day to make the purchase! Sorry, a bit off topic! :p 
March 11, 2016 10:54:26 PM

It really depends on the laptop. I just replaced a NVIDIA Geoforce GTX 970M on an MSI GT70 2QD Dominator laptop. This card is completely replaceable - just requires some cleaning and reapplication of thermal paste. When the GPU is integrated into the motherboard (like my 17" 2011 Macbook Pro), there is no real opportunity for upgrade. When it has glitched out due to the known NVIDIA issue with this Apple line, I have had no choice but to reflow the solder around the GPU with a heat gun. So far this has worked.
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