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LimeWire Sued for $75 Trillion, Judge Denies

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Last response: in Streaming Video & TVs
March 24, 2011 2:20:02 PM

Those guys should be locked up in a mental institution if they thought that 75 trillion amount would ever fly.
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9
March 24, 2011 2:23:14 PM

They're not actually expecting to get that much money. They're simply grandstanding.
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5
March 24, 2011 2:24:15 PM

failed troll attempt?
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4
March 24, 2011 2:26:59 PM

Goodbye, Limewire.
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0
March 24, 2011 2:27:57 PM

Quote:
Those guys should be locked up in a mental institution if they thought that 75 trillion amount would ever fly.


To be fair, that income could be taxed at ~35%, or just over 25 Trillion USD. That kinda solves our debt problem...
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7
March 24, 2011 2:30:38 PM

What's happenning to our Lawers here in the US? Luckily we still have Judges that have good common senses.
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7
March 24, 2011 2:32:59 PM

For the simple fact they wanted $75T, the judge should award $1 in damages and no punitive damages at all.

In reference to the taxes, only punitive damages are taxable, but the attorneys in the case would get 30-40% of the damage award, and therefore be taxed at 35%.
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6
March 24, 2011 2:33:12 PM

Tom's should write a solid, objective and detailed story on the facts regarding "piracy" - what's legal, what's not - what is the fundamental argument on both sides. The issue now is just too emotional and too muddy, and it's time the entire issue is rationalized. I thought that piracy is actually, legally speaking, simply file sharing - am I wrong? And no, I'm not asking about right and wrong, I'm asking about the law and how it classifies and addresses it.
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4
March 24, 2011 2:35:58 PM

"400 billion, thats insane"
"no, lets add 75 trillion as the max. 400 doesn't look so insane now does it?"
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Anonymous
March 24, 2011 2:37:23 PM

How much did the Limewire guys actually make on that program, because one word would take care of them....

BANKRUPTCY

Record industry doesn't get squat....game over.
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March 24, 2011 2:48:26 PM

Quote:
"As defendants note, plaintiffs are suggesting an award that is 'more money than the entire music recording industry has made since Edison's invention of the phonograph in 1877,'" Wood added.


This is the key to the absurdity of the claim. The point of statutory damages is to recover losses where the actual value is not known (who knows how many of those pirated songs led to a loss on the part of the music industry). That is why its an arbitrary $150,000 per song, because someone somewhere thought that sounded like a reasonable fee. And even at that fee, 10,000 songs is 1.5 billion dollars (I doubt the record industry lost anywhere near this much as a result of limewire, but who knows).

To claim they are owed more money as a result of their loss then they've ever made in history should be criminal, and I'm glad the judge struck it down in this case.
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3
March 24, 2011 2:53:14 PM

omnimodis78Tom's should write a solid, objective and detailed story on the facts regarding "piracy" - what's legal, what's not - what is the fundamental argument on both sides. The issue now is just too emotional and too muddy, and it's time the entire issue is rationalized. I thought that piracy is actually, legally speaking, simply file sharing - am I wrong? And no, I'm not asking about right and wrong, I'm asking about the law and how it classifies and addresses it.

read the first page of any book printed in america.

i've researched alot of the copyright and patent laws on how to get a few of my ideas patented and copyrighted. having read about 1/2 the relevant material regarding both copy right and patents it's a night mare that could be simplified into about 3-5 paragraphs if all lawyers and judges were sent to the bottom of the ocean. i say i read half of it because most of it is irrelevant b.s. to make lawyers rich just from hourly charges alone. most of the legal system is that way.
Quote:

If the present Congress errs in too much talking, how can it be otherwise in a body to which the people send one hundred and fifty lawyers, whose trade it is to question everything, yield nothing, and talk by the hour?
Thomas Jefferson
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March 24, 2011 2:54:56 PM

Im pretty sure the heads of the entertainment industry and thier lawyers sit in boardrooms all day smoking crack. $75 Trillion for christ sake, do these guys operate some random number generator /facepalm
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2
March 24, 2011 3:00:04 PM

It all started with the cd, when the cd came out, there was a royalty for the cd players. On top of that the price jumped from about $4.99 to $8.99 per vinyl LP to $17.99 to 21.99 for cd's.
I bought a 5 disk cd player a cheap citizen brand it was i think $300, some other better brands were over $500. LP's had of course the cost of turntable maintenance and carbon fiber cleaning brushes that wore out, to run a turntable you had to buy a new cartridge or diamond needle about every 6 months, if it was belt drive sometimes but rare the belt would break, the turntable also had to be cleaned/oiled calibrated when you replaced the needle or cartridge. If you did not keep this up you can damage the LP's. In the end you spent about $30 to $100/year.
At the beginning the record companies tried to say the cd was more expensive but you saved cash because they were maintenance free. But $20 per cd was a bit steep.
A little while later the cd-rw's came out on computers with the 4x cdrw. It took 20 mins to copy a cd at 4x. At $20 per cd what do you think people did?
The record companies did this to themselves by being greedy. Also at $20 a cd there was no room for budget bands that used to start out with $4.99 albums. At $4.99 you were like "oh ok ill take a chance on them." So the emerging bar bands got pushed aside.
This was before the internet and limewire or napster.

I think basically they want to bankrupt limewire so the name can be bought out and used as a music sales site just like napster is today. The same thing happened with napster. It was bankrupted and bought out by the music companies.
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March 24, 2011 3:03:36 PM

correction: before higher speed internet, there was a slow dialup internet at the start.
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March 24, 2011 3:35:18 PM

Can't wait till the RIAA Disappears.
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5
March 24, 2011 3:38:30 PM

While this is laughable. The intent to generate buzz has been successful on the part of the plaintiffs.
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March 24, 2011 3:46:36 PM

Nexus52085Goodbye, Limewire.


There is a Lime Wire Pirate Version on the Torrents if you want it.

Nothing is ever gone from the internet!!
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1
March 24, 2011 3:48:45 PM

75 trillion dollars? That's it, just to see the look on the judge's face I'm going to sue my brother for a quadrillion dollars for breaking one of my toys when I was 6.
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March 24, 2011 3:57:08 PM

LimeWire should sue for 100 Trillion for wrongful damages.
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2
March 24, 2011 3:59:14 PM

This is the single most preposterous successful lawsuit. That's like suing car companies if you loved one was slain by a motor vehicle. People use products, regardless of the legality.
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-1
March 24, 2011 4:01:25 PM

rmmil97875 trillion dollars? That's it, just to see the look on the judge's face I'm going to sue my brother for a quadrillion dollars for breaking one of my toys when I was 6.


But if you take today's corporate thinking, you never owned those toys. You merely had the license to play with them. So technically you owe the toy industry money for violating their TOS because your brother played with those toys (and breaking them) without a license.
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Anonymous
March 24, 2011 4:03:26 PM

The music industry should be slapped with a stiff penalty for wasting the courts' time.
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March 24, 2011 4:05:50 PM

Things are getting out of hand.
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March 24, 2011 4:19:41 PM

It's like Austin Powers
"Ok then, we hold the world ransom for 100 Billion dollars!"
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1
March 24, 2011 4:27:41 PM

f-14read the first page of any book printed in america.

Yeah, I hear you brother, but I think there are some pretty interesting variables to consider. Such as, international laws, do copyright laws actually address file sharing? Are the standards applicable? If this was as black-and-white as the lawyers try to make it out to be with their scare tactics, then wouldn't there be a lawsuit at every single turn. all the time? It always seems to me that they're trying to hold onto loopholes, that the politicians are trying to figure out how to address this issue - doesn't that indicate that there's no clear cut resolution to this issue. I still think that if Tom's wrote on this, a smart but easy to understand story, it would be a very popular read indeed.
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1
March 24, 2011 4:29:51 PM

Apparently, they don't bother with the fact that at least a couple million users are also Canadian or in Canada... where it's 100% legal to download music and movies for free (for personal, non profit use)
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March 24, 2011 4:39:46 PM

I know record labels are protected by laws but who is protecting us from record labels?:)  Well, at least some rational judges.

If "anyone" had to pay for every track or video or movie would "anyone" ever spent as much as he/she downloaded. This is a hypothesis that big companies "use" to their side to produce those amazing numbers. And this is only for Limewire but how about for the total amount in the whole planet. (Absurd x absurd).

In my personal experience I always preferred very high quality engineering or expertise and that was very limited on services like Limewire. So anyway I replaced those junky files with legal purchases on Amazon and iTunes. At least the ones I really care, so I owe very little or nothing to anyone. But I can only speak for myself.

I like the convenience of internet and now I use iTunes and Amazon, but I am starting to miss video stores and record stores everywhere. I miss the pleasing experience to have the quality objects in my hand and I want somehow something back. Perhaps an interactive universal application on full screen I could play on many devices with plenty information will be enough. Not necesserly iTunes and probably something very specialized and sustainable.
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March 24, 2011 4:48:04 PM

yrmomaThis is the single most preposterous successful lawsuit. That's like suing car companies if you loved one was slain by a motor vehicle. People use products, regardless of the legality.


Lets take it a step further. Lets say I just bought a pickup truck, an F150 if you will, and I'm transporting pirated copies of CD's. That's the only reason i purchased that truck. The truck itself has 100's of legit, legal uses, but I'm only using it to sell pirated CD's. Using this logic, Ford is responsible for my piracy.... :/ 

I say use all the money they spent on legal fees and find some real talent. When you have artists like Ke$ha and Justin Beiber, I'm surprised anybody is downloading at all. You'd have to pay ME $75 trillion to want to hear any of that garbage.
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1
March 24, 2011 5:27:01 PM

I should sue them for a few billion for boggling my mind on how they think they should get that sum.

On a rather bizarre and slightly related note regarding djsting's comment, Ford tried to sue Ferrari for the use of the F150 name in case people become confused (F150 because it's Italy's 150th year of unification). Ford's being F-150 and Ferrari's F150. Now, one is a Formula One single seat racer, the other a pickup. Who will get those confused?
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1
March 24, 2011 5:31:24 PM

LOL!
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1
Anonymous
March 24, 2011 5:43:41 PM

I don't waste my time listening to any of the garbage the music industry has put out for many years now. There is so much fabulous really great music that has been produced in the past, if you take the time to look for it, its out there. It's just young kids wasting their parents' money on the latest pop stuff because they don't know better. When they become adults they will hopefully become exposed to good music. If the adults here older than 20 don't do something to educate, promote, preserve and make great music accessible, then yes when we are old we will have to listen to crap music because that's all that will be out there. The best way we can fight mediocre/crap the music industry is putting out is to make sure as many young people as possible get to hear and appreciate really great music. There is huge universe of music that has been recorded already, many lifetime's worth starting from wonderful classical music, opera, early blues, swing, 1920s-30s jazz, big band, 50s, 60s, 70s, ethnic music from other places - hawaiian, tahitian, arabic/Middle Eastern, indian, salsa, bachata, merengue, cumbia, vallenato, bolero, mambo, son, ache, zouk, bossa nova, samba, tango, calypso, carribean, reggae, African, Chinese, etc share your favorite music with others, then educated/aware young people won't waste money on crap.
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1
Anonymous
March 24, 2011 5:46:40 PM

The music companies can sue anybody they want but they will never stop us from sharing files. Music is 100% free and gets more free and available year after year. People have downloaded tens of thousands of songs through my Limewire app which by the way still works perfectly well almost 6 months after Limewire was supposedly shut down. Music companies: we will DANCE ON YOUR GRAVES!!!!! Long live piracy!!! Mark Montgomery NYC, NY boboberg@nyc.rr.com
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1
March 24, 2011 6:00:52 PM

im actually surprised i haven't seen SKY in the courts yet, the way these companies think, and some of the absurd ideas of copyright laws around at the moment, as i said, surprised sky isn't in court yet,
sky viewers are able to view virtually every latest and greatest song in the industry, most of the newest films and alot of shows that are available on DVD,
but then they have the record option, which allows the viewer to make a copy of the songs, vids/movies and so on, this then allows the option to be sent to the PC to be recorded to a dvd or storage drive of some sort,
doesnt this break the copyright laws in any way,
just thinking out loud, so if i am wrong, sorry.
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0
March 24, 2011 6:11:43 PM

This is why I don't buy any new music except from small indie artists.
Of course I am lucky, as I am in my mid 30's so I am ok with mostly old CD's from the 80's and 90's, new indie stuff and podcasts in my music player.
SCREW off sony capital and the rest of you bloodsuckers !!

I also refuse to by Sony computers cameras and all the rest.
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Anonymous
March 24, 2011 6:16:06 PM

They're using the maximum penalty per user to come up with that enormous figure. If I were a member of limewire, I probably would not have downloaded more than a hundred songs; an approximate value of $100.00. I don't know how large the average user's file library is, but the songs definitely should not be valued at more than $1.00 per person. In addition, I doubt the record companies receive 100% gross proceeds, it's probably closer to 75 cents per song. Also, will they be sharing the settlement with the artists whose works were traded illegally?
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March 24, 2011 7:20:50 PM

That's way over 9000 dollars.
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March 24, 2011 7:46:37 PM

Isn't it sweet if you could just say that you had $75 Trillion, because someone owes you $75 Trillion? Where will you spend that $75 Trillion!? (that someone owes you)
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-1
March 24, 2011 7:58:06 PM

Boycott All MAFIAA Products
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2
March 24, 2011 8:04:14 PM

So yet again the record industry is hoping to scare people, they rather lose 1 mil to lawyer bills and get 1 dime from that rather than acualy spend that money to produce good music that sells. Now there is logic in that...

Im happy i havent spent a dime on music the past ten years, it would only been used to pay lawyers rather than the artists who produced it!

I hope the record inustry dinasaurs die to pave a way for new music evolution!
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0
March 24, 2011 9:08:09 PM

omnimodis78Tom's should write a solid, objective and detailed story on the facts regarding "piracy" - what's legal, what's not - what is the fundamental argument on both sides. The issue now is just too emotional and too muddy, and it's time the entire issue is rationalized. I thought that piracy is actually, legally speaking, simply file sharing - am I wrong? And no, I'm not asking about right and wrong, I'm asking about the law and how it classifies and addresses it.

Piracy, in regards to digital media, is the willful theft of intellectual property.
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March 24, 2011 9:17:59 PM

wolfram23Apparently, they don't bother with the fact that at least a couple million users are also Canadian or in Canada... where it's 100% legal to download music and movies for free (for personal, non profit use)


What?
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0
March 24, 2011 9:46:50 PM

75 trillion ??? hahahahahahaha

I think they knows that the music labels are already dead and they wants enough money for the rest of their lifes :) 

ok , THEY WILL NOT GET A F#@$ PENNY

get a real job you scams , its time for a real work , no money , no beautiful women , no perfect cars , no big houses, nothing for you anymore. The digital world is here , you re finished...
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0
March 24, 2011 10:43:00 PM

Its no doubt they were grandstanding with the $75T. Unfortunately, that absurd amount just makes them look immature and it makes there case look illegitimate. No different then if they asked for a bahgillion or gazillion dollars.
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March 24, 2011 10:46:50 PM

what a greedy people. sure, give them 75 trillion Zimbabwe dollars.
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2
March 24, 2011 11:14:33 PM

That's what they always do. They request the absolute maximum then settle for what they can get. The settlement ends up being higher because it's "lower than the maximum". They seem to be settling low at a billion when it could be 75 trillion.

The RIAA would shake babies upside down if they thought change would fall out. In the end their ludicrous behavior only harms their cause. People don't see something like this and think "oh god, what if they sue me", because, hey, none of us have a billion to give them. In the end they just threaten to bankrupt people. Most people heavily pirating are doing so because they don't have any money to begin with, what do they care if they have to go bankrupt? The RIAA isn't going to take their food stamps and rental trailers.

What people do think after reading this is "oh...well I'm not going to support these greedy trolls, I might as well pirate just so they won't get my money". Thanks for increasing piracy daily, RIAA, you can't sue a million people.
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Anonymous
March 25, 2011 12:14:16 AM

The RIAA and MPAA are some real genuine losers and attempting to claim 75 trillion in damages is not only mentally retarded but shows what greedy assholes they really are. The RIAA and MPAA themselves should be outlawed.
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0
March 25, 2011 12:46:18 AM

f-14read the first page of any book printed in america.i've researched alot of the copyright and patent laws on how to get a few of my ideas patented and copyrighted. having read about 1/2 the relevant material regarding both copy right and patents it's a night mare that could be simplified into about 3-5 paragraphs if all lawyers and judges were sent to the bottom of the ocean. i say i read half of it because most of it is irrelevant b.s. to make lawyers rich just from hourly charges alone. most of the legal system is that way.


piracy (as it is now) is lumped into counterfeiting laws, laws which are in place to stop people from creating a criminal enterprise based on knocking off someone elses work, or bootlegging movies and music, to pawn on the streets.

there needs to be a section of law that deals with civilians who just get a few songs, because as it stands, music costs 1$ to buy, in most cases, but costs up to 150,000$ per instance (and 5 years in prison) of piracy if caught, which is INSANE.
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March 25, 2011 2:08:53 AM

I sue you for 1 googles of monies! Now puts it in the pockets!
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2
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