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Laptop functions perfectly with a fully charged battery: Won't charge working battery or power on while plugged in

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  • Battery
  • Laptops
  • MSI-Microstar
Last response: in Laptop Tech Support
July 28, 2016 2:07:46 AM

Relevant information:

Have 2x MSI laptops, both use the same battery type and AC Adapter so I have lots of testing between the two to confirm where I think the problem is.

Problem Laptop: CX61-2QF
Tried with it's own battery and the battery in the working one: Doesn't charge either battery
Charged both batteries in the working laptop, then put them in the non-working one: Laptop will run off battery without issues, but will not charge either battery

Tried both AC adapters that came stock with each laptop as well as a 3rd that worked on both laptops prior.

Called MSI Directly and had them ship me a new Power Jack cable. Replaced the power jack in the computer

Still not charging/powering on without battery.

We bought these laptops in Tokyo last year and despite MSI offering a 2 year warranty, apparently because we didn't buy them in the US they chopped the warranty down to like 8 months.

What should I check/try next?
Thanks~

More about : laptop functions perfectly fully charged battery charge working battery power plugged

July 30, 2016 9:40:22 PM

I'm really at a loss on what to do here, ANY suggestions would be extremely helpful
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a c 779 D Laptop
August 5, 2016 2:22:33 PM

So you said the power cords were checked, but not if worked or not. Did they work on both devices? Or on just one?

Have you tried running the laptop with the charger cord only, while the battery is removed, and if so, does it work?

You could also try the following... if you haven't already...

Try the following and see if it will turn on.

1. First make sure the device has been charged.
2. Unplug your charger cord.
3. Remove the battery.
4. Press and hold the "Power" button for 30 seconds and see if the device will turn on.
5. If it does, great, now plug back in the power/charger cord. (If it didn't turn on without the cord in, it should turn on once you it is in.)
6. Now put the battery back in.

If none of these help, the problem may well be the charging circuit on the motherboard.
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August 6, 2016 5:09:21 AM

webworkings said:
So you said the power cords were checked, but not if worked or not. Did they work on both devices? Or on just one?

Have you tried running the laptop with the charger cord only, while the battery is removed, and if so, does it work?

You could also try the following... if you haven't already...

Try the following and see if it will turn on.

1. First make sure the device has been charged.
2. Unplug your charger cord.
3. Remove the battery.
4. Press and hold the "Power" button for 30 seconds and see if the device will turn on.
5. If it does, great, now plug back in the power/charger cord. (If it didn't turn on without the cord in, it should turn on once you it is in.)
6. Now put the battery back in.

If none of these help, the problem may well be the charging circuit on the motherboard.


So the charging circuit on the board is the DC Power Jack Cable or the actual on-board circuit for the Motherboard? Is the only option if it's on-board is whole replacement of the board or is there a definitive test to determine where the problem lies?

I've done everything you listed with no success. Basically 2 Laptops, 2 Batteries that work in both, 2 Charging cables.

Both batteries work in both laptops (If the batteries are charged)
Both Charging cables work on one laptop
Charging cable does nothing on the non-working laptop.
If I charge a battery in the working laptop, the non-working laptop will work perfectly with the fully charged battery (but won't charge further)
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a c 779 D Laptop
August 6, 2016 2:02:31 PM

Hmmm... Have you checked the charger cords port to see if it is loose or damaged?

I know you can 'repair' the charging circuit, at least on many, without replacing the full motherboard. You would just have to locate the damaged circuit and either get a replacement piece and solder it in, or you can try using a thin wire in its place. However, the latter, while making it work, will also leave it without an actual circuit to trip if the problem happens again.

Now if you don't feel comfortable working with the one small piece, then you would need to get someone to do it, or replace the whole motherboard.
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a c 532 D Laptop
August 6, 2016 2:31:47 PM

webworkings said:
Hmmm... Have you checked the charger cords port to see if it is loose or damaged?

I know you can 'repair' the charging circuit, at least on many, without replacing the full motherboard. You would just have to locate the damaged circuit and either get a replacement piece and solder it in, or you can try using a thin wire in its place. However, the latter, while making it work, will also leave it without an actual circuit to trip if the problem happens again.

Now if you don't feel comfortable working with the one small piece, then you would need to get someone to do it, or replace the whole motherboard.


Hi, I curious about what you wrote "or you can try using a thin wire in its place", what do you mean about that?
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a c 779 D Laptop
August 6, 2016 2:50:21 PM

Instead of getting an actual new circuit, removing the old one, and soldering in the new one in its place, I have known a few people who have left the damaged one where it was, but soldered on a thin wire over it/next to it, connecting the two points again, and got it to work. Since I have seen it done, I have listed it here. I have also seen it mentioned here and there on the net. However, that said, it isn't the best choice/option, but I had to add it. :) 
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a c 532 D Laptop
August 6, 2016 3:16:23 PM

webworkings said:
Instead of getting an actual new circuit, removing the old one, and soldering in the new one in its place, I have known a few people who have left the damaged one where it was, but soldered on a thin wire over it/next to it, connecting the two points again, and got it to work. Since I have seen it done, I have listed it here. I have also seen it mentioned here and there on the net. However, that said, it isn't the best choice/option, but I had to add it. :) 


People on this site don't know how to repair laptop, even you, don't know which circuit to replace with a wire, I don't think this is a good advice to tell them to short something with a wire.
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a c 779 D Laptop
August 6, 2016 6:58:33 PM

I was not saying to 'short' it with a wire. I would never say that. Per the last line of my reply. It isn't something I would recommend, just something I have seen done. My suggestion was to replace it with the correct component.
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a c 532 D Laptop
August 8, 2016 2:34:02 PM

neonend said:
Relevant information:

Have 2x MSI laptops, both use the same battery type and AC Adapter so I have lots of testing between the two to confirm where I think the problem is.

Problem Laptop: CX61-2QF
Tried with it's own battery and the battery in the working one: Doesn't charge either battery
Charged both batteries in the working laptop, then put them in the non-working one: Laptop will run off battery without issues, but will not charge either battery

Tried both AC adapters that came stock with each laptop as well as a 3rd that worked on both laptops prior.

Called MSI Directly and had them ship me a new Power Jack cable. Replaced the power jack in the computer

Still not charging/powering on without battery.

We bought these laptops in Tokyo last year and despite MSI offering a 2 year warranty, apparently because we didn't buy them in the US they chopped the warranty down to like 8 months.

What should I check/try next?
Thanks~


If you are refering "Power Jack cable" to the DC jack inside the laptop with a wire to a connector, and the laptop is still not powering with the AC adapter. You have a defective charging circuit on the motherboard.
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