Your question

Computer Randomly Shutting Down, without Blue Screen

Tags:
  • System Restart
  • Computers
  • Laptops
  • Shutdown
  • Windows 7
  • Kernel 41
  • Blue Screen
Last response: in Laptop Tech Support
May 3, 2015 9:42:57 PM

As the title of this post indicates, my problem is that my laptop has been shutting down without any BSOD showing up.

The event viewer shows that my laptop has had three occasions of ID 41 Error, two of which happened within this week (April 28th, May 3rd) and one of which happened over three months ago (January 28th).

The two recent instances indicated the following parameters:

Event Data

    BugcheckCode 0
    BugcheckParameter1 0x0
    BugcheckParameter2 0x0
    BugcheckParameter3 0x0
    BugcheckParameter4 0x0
    SleepInProgress false
    PowerButtonTimestamp 0


While looking for other forum posts, I tried analyzing the memory.dmp file, but nowhere in %SystemRoot%\ did memory.dmp file exist.

For specifications,

    OS Name: Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate K
    Version: 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601
    System Model: HP Pavilion 15 Notebook PC
    System Type: x64-based PC
    Processor: AMD A8-5545M APU with Radeon(tm) HD Graphics, 1700Mhz, 4 Core
    BIOS Version: Insyde F.02


Please inform me if I need to provide further information.

More about : computer randomly shutting blue screen

May 3, 2015 11:02:45 PM

Hello unlikesuika,

This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly.
When a computer that is running Windows starts, a check is performed to determine whether the computer was shut down cleanly. If the computer was not shut down cleanly, a Kernel Power Event 41 message is generated.

For more information, see the following article on the Microsoft TechNet blog:
How to Debug Kernel Mode Blue Screen Crashes (for beginners)

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Related resources
a b D Laptop
May 4, 2015 5:03:04 PM

This is often a sign of interrupted power to the laptop, the fault could be within the laptop internal circuit or mains power/laptop charger if it gets hot a thermal sensor will shut power off as a safety protection or an intermittent fault in the wiring. When these power shutdowns occur feel your block to feel if its got hot
If the laptop battery is not being charged whilst plugged in could be due to a faulty jack socket and as the connection is lost your battery gets drained to 0% dies. Giving no blue screen message. Watch your laptop power charging meter and check it's charging connection is lost whilst using it. If battery percentage is good and it still dies your problem is more serious like motherboard fault.
Check your power options in control panel change the setting to allow the laptop to shut down if the battery gets to 10%
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May 4, 2015 7:13:07 PM

Im Spartacus said:
This is often a sign of interrupted power to the laptop, the fault could be within the laptop internal circuit or mains power/laptop charger if it gets hot a thermal sensor will shut power off as a safety protection or an intermittent fault in the wiring. When these power shutdowns occur feel your block to feel if its got hot
If the laptop battery is not being charged whilst plugged in could be due to a faulty jack socket and as the connection is lost your battery gets drained to 0% dies. Giving no blue screen message. Watch your laptop power charging meter and check it's charging connection is lost whilst using it. If battery percentage is good and it still dies your problem is more serious like motherboard fault.
Check your power options in control panel change the setting to allow the laptop to shut down if the battery gets to 10%


The laptop was around 60˚C (140˚F) when it suddenly restarted. I didn't think that it was the cooling problem, unless my computer is especially susceptible to temperature change.

The battery was at 100% when it restarted. It was not battery drainage either.

I guess that leaves one possibility, which is that the problem is with the motherboard.
Would I have to take the laptop apart in this case? I am concerned that I would not be able to do this at the moment, because I am right in the exam period, and I need my computer to study.
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a c 362 $ Windows 7
a b D Laptop
May 5, 2015 10:39:06 AM

the name and location of the memory dump change depending on the type of memory dump requested. (and the vendor of the machine might change the defaults)

the default memory dump type is minidump
the default location is
c:\windows\minidump directory and the files have a date encoded in them with a .dmp file extentions

if you have selected a kernel or full memory dump the default location and name of the FILE will be
c:\windows\memory.dmp

you can also search your hard drive for files with the .dmp file extension.

the error message you indicated means that the system booted up after a previous shutdown did not complete. IE the machine bugchecked, overheated, or lost power.


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May 6, 2015 6:32:13 PM

shamila said:
Hello unlikesuika,
Use this command..
DumpChk [-y SymbolPath] DumpFile
Link is here..
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardwa...
Also go here..
http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Analyze-a-BSOD-C...


If you mean using cmd.exe to type in "DumpChk ... Dumpfile", I tried inputting this line:
DumpChk [-y C:\Windows] DumpFile

When I did that, nothing happened, instead the next line showing this.
http://i.imgur.com/V1ytM5O.png
Well, my computer is in Korean, so I'll try to translate..
" 'DumpChk' is not internal/external command, executable program, or batch file."

When I tried running dumpchk.exe that I installed from Microsoft, the program automatically closes itself.
I managed to take a screenshot of what the program said while it was closing itself:
http://imgur.com/8eEPRDw

It says "Usage: C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\8.1\Debuggers\x64\dumpchk.exe [-y <sympath>] <dumpfile>"

Is there anything I am doing incorrectly?
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May 9, 2015 4:41:19 PM

Agh, it happened again. My computer restarted. (Oh, and I don't know how much this matters, but when I've been saying that my computer has been shutting down, I actually meant that the computer has been restarting. Sorry about this.)

Again, there was no BSOD, because BSOD would have showed up since I set the computer to not restart upon blue screen.
Also, the battery was connected, and the computer stayed around 55-60˚C, so it was not overheating.
When the computer restarted, I was looking at a PDF file while studying. Last time this shutdown happened, I was looking at a Youtube entry, so I can't find consistency.

Here is the event detail that my Event Viewer displays.
BugcheckCode 0
BugcheckParameter1 0x0
BugcheckParameter2 0x0
BugcheckParameter3 0x0
BugcheckParameter4 0x0
SleepInProgress false
PowerButtonTimestamp 0

I still can't find memory.dmp file, and I'm still having the same trouble that I outlined in my previous response.
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a b D Laptop
May 9, 2015 9:42:50 PM

Have you checked the following that your system is set to write the event (dmp file) to system log
Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
Click Performance and Maintenance, and then click System.
On the Advanced tab, click Settings under Startup and Recovery.
Do you have box's ticked to write dmp files.

You can also find dmp files by typing the following *.dmp in a search screen on your hard drive.


Have you tried running diagnostic tests?
http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c02491515
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May 23, 2015 2:12:26 PM

Im Spartacus said:
Have you checked the following that your system is set to write the event (dmp file) to system log
Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
Click Performance and Maintenance, and then click System.
On the Advanced tab, click Settings under Startup and Recovery.
Do you have box's ticked to write dmp files.

You can also find dmp files by typing the following *.dmp in a search screen on your hard drive.


Have you tried running diagnostic tests?
http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c02491515


I tried following your instructions, but in the Control Panel, I couldn't find "Performance and Maintenance" menu.
Also, in the diagnostic test link, I've updated HP Support Assistant.
I have tried looking for "HP Vision Diagnostics" or "Hardware Diagnostic Tools", and the instructions informed me that I would have either of them, but strangely, I had none of them.
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May 23, 2015 2:17:56 PM

I've searched "*.dmp* in my C: Local Disk, and I got the following DMP files:
CRASH.DMP
WD-20140422-1018.dmp
WD-20140423-1302.dmp
WD-20140516-0036.dmp

Are any of these DMP files useful? None of the dates indicated in the WD-...dmp files correspond with the dates when Kernel-Power Event ID 41 happened.
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a c 362 $ Windows 7
a b D Laptop
May 23, 2015 5:25:15 PM

put them on a server like microsoft one drive and post a link.
it may give a idea as to the cause of the problems

unlikesuika said:
I've searched "*.dmp* in my C: Local Disk, and I got the following DMP files:
CRASH.DMP
WD-20140422-1018.dmp
WD-20140423-1302.dmp
WD-20140516-0036.dmp

Are any of these DMP files useful? None of the dates indicated in the WD-...dmp files correspond with the dates when Kernel-Power Event ID 41 happened.


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a c 362 $ Windows 7
a b D Laptop
May 24, 2015 12:12:05 PM

I would update the video drivers as a first step, then maybe find the driver that owns the tag in question.
(I assume it is from the video drivers but can not tell)
-------
third bugheck was the same as the second.

crash.dmp looks like a bad memory address used in a subsystem or emulator.

second crash was a video driver not responding.
video driver was: atikmpag.sys Fri Dec 06 12:21:45 2013
pooltag was 202b
you will have to use the findstr.exe command to figure out what driver on your machine uses that pool tag.
Then update that driver. Basically, run cmd.exe as an admin then run the command
findstr.exe /m /l 202b *.sys

it should list a driver name, then google that driver name to figure out what it is for.



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May 28, 2015 9:59:58 AM

johnbl said:
I would update the video drivers as a first step, then maybe find the driver that owns the tag in question.
(I assume it is from the video drivers but can not tell)
-------
third bugheck was the same as the second.

crash.dmp looks like a bad memory address used in a subsystem or emulator.

second crash was a video driver not responding.
video driver was: atikmpag.sys Fri Dec 06 12:21:45 2013
pooltag was 202b
you will have to use the findstr.exe command to figure out what driver on your machine uses that pool tag.
Then update that driver. Basically, run cmd.exe as an admin then run the command
findstr.exe /m /l 202b *.sys

it should list a driver name, then google that driver name to figure out what it is for.





I just tried running such command in cmd.exe, and no list was returned, as the screenshot below indicates.
http://i.imgur.com/iXls0T7.png
I've checked that I've been running cmd.exe as administrator. Repeating the command multiple times or waiting for 10 minutes after running the command still didn't return anything.
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a c 362 $ Windows 7
a b D Laptop
May 30, 2015 6:28:08 AM

sorry, I guess you needed to be in the actual drivers directory.
here is a better written way: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/298102
or you can google "how to locate a pooltag for a driver"

unlikesuika said:
johnbl said:
I would update the video drivers as a first step, then maybe find the driver that owns the tag in question.
(I assume it is from the video drivers but can not tell)
-------
third bugheck was the same as the second.

crash.dmp looks like a bad memory address used in a subsystem or emulator.

second crash was a video driver not responding.
video driver was: atikmpag.sys Fri Dec 06 12:21:45 2013
pooltag was 202b
you will have to use the findstr.exe command to figure out what driver on your machine uses that pool tag.
Then update that driver. Basically, run cmd.exe as an admin then run the command
findstr.exe /m /l 202b *.sys

it should list a driver name, then google that driver name to figure out what it is for.





I just tried running such command in cmd.exe, and no list was returned, as the screenshot below indicates.
http://i.imgur.com/iXls0T7.png
I've checked that I've been running cmd.exe as administrator. Repeating the command multiple times or waiting for 10 minutes after running the command still didn't return anything.


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July 22, 2015 9:27:14 PM

I'm sorry for the late reply.

johnbl said:
sorry, I guess you needed to be in the actual drivers directory.
here is a better written way: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/298102
or you can google "how to locate a pooltag for a driver"


I chose the latter choice, since I didn't really understand much from the former.
So googling led me to this blog post:
http://windowsitpro.com/windows/jsi-tip-7102-how-do-i-d...

It basically tells me how to find driver names <b>from</b> the pool tag, so I googled something like "how to find a pooltag", since inputting "202b" for the pooltag didn't work for me.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askperf/archive/2008/04/11/a...

Now, the problem is that I found this pooltag.txt, and I can't find any entry with "202b" anywhere in the file.
Should I upload that pooltag.txt file as well?
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a c 362 $ Windows 7
a b D Laptop
July 24, 2015 8:46:55 AM

I could not find that pooltag also, which means you have to search for the tag in the actual device driver binary files on your local computer. (start cmd.exe as a admin, then use the findstr.exe command to search for the string inside of binary files. Best to google for the actual command. or run findstr.exe /? to get help)
generally it will be something like this: start cmd.exe as an admin, then
cd drivers
findstr.exe /m /l "202b" *.sys
if it does not find one, make sure you enter the command correctly or search for a known tag like "afd"
findstr.exe /m /l "afd" *.sys
should return a file name afd.sys just to confirm you are using the command correctly. (this tag is for winsock support and will always be on your computer)

unlikesuika said:
I'm sorry for the late reply.

johnbl said:
sorry, I guess you needed to be in the actual drivers directory.
here is a better written way: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/298102
or you can google "how to locate a pooltag for a driver"


I chose the latter choice, since I didn't really understand much from the former.
So googling led me to this blog post:
http://windowsitpro.com/windows/jsi-tip-7102-how-do-i-d...

It basically tells me how to find driver names <b>from</b> the pool tag, so I googled something like "how to find a pooltag", since inputting "202b" for the pooltag didn't work for me.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askperf/archive/2008/04/11/a...

Now, the problem is that I found this pooltag.txt, and I can't find any entry with "202b" anywhere in the file.
Should I upload that pooltag.txt file as well?


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July 24, 2015 8:51:29 AM

johnbl said:
I could not find that pooltag also, which means you have to search for the tag in the actual device driver binary files on your local computer. (start cmd.exe as a admin, then use the findstr.exe command to search for the string inside of binary files. Best to google for the actual command. or run findstr.exe /? to get help)
generally it will be something like this: start cmd.exe as an admin, then
cd drivers
findstr.exe /m /l "202b" *.sys
if it does not find one, make sure you enter the command correctly or search for a known tag like "afd"
findstr.exe /m /l "afd" *.sys
should return a file name afd.sys just to confirm you are using the command correctly. (this tag is for winsock support and will always be on your computer)



I'll try doing this, and on the other note, I just remembered that I've recently been using Virtual Clone Drive. I wonder if it's relevant though.
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July 24, 2015 9:27:12 AM

johnbl said:
I could not find that pooltag also, which means you have to search for the tag in the actual device driver binary files on your local computer. (start cmd.exe as a admin, then use the findstr.exe command to search for the string inside of binary files. Best to google for the actual command. or run findstr.exe /? to get help)
generally it will be something like this: start cmd.exe as an admin, then
cd drivers
findstr.exe /m /l "202b" *.sys
if it does not find one, make sure you enter the command correctly or search for a known tag like "afd"
findstr.exe /m /l "afd" *.sys
should return a file name afd.sys just to confirm you are using the command correctly. (this tag is for winsock support and will always be on your computer)


So I've tried these commands, and this is the result I got:
http://i.imgur.com/XxCJdQX.png

"202b" didn't return anything, while "afd" returned something like "clfs.sys".
I should try googling for more commands at this point.
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a c 362 $ Windows 7
a b D Laptop
July 24, 2015 12:56:36 PM

you were in the wrong directory when you typed in the command.
you have to use the change directory command and get in the drivers directory before you call the findstr command
so issue the command
cd drivers

on my system it would be I would be in the
c:\windows\system32\drivers directory before I run the command.
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